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THE 



College Forum. 



SEPTEMBER, 1894. 



• f CONTENTS : -f • 



Carlyle's Heroes and Hero Worship, 97-99 

The Newspaper as an Educator, 100, 101 

Education and Life, 101, 102 

September, 102 

Charge on the School Brigade, 102 

Editorials, 103 

The Opening, 103, 104 

°ur New Teachers, 104 

The Lecture Course, 104, 105 

Per 8onal, 105 

C °llege Day Collections, 105 

College Directory, 106 



Oil 



onian Literary Society, 10G 



Kalozetean Literary Society, 10G, 107 

Philokosmian Literary Society, 107 

A Pleasing Social Event, 107 

Y. M. C. A. Notes, 107, 108 

The Maryland Reunion, 108 

Personals and Locals, 108 

Alumni, 109 

The Model Teacher, 109 

"Unprinted Words," 109, 110 

Color Blindness, 110 

George Eliot, 110 

In the Exchange Realm, 110 

Advertisements, Ill, 112 



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THE COLLEGE EQEUM 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VII. No. 7. ANNVILLE, PA., SEPTEMBER, 1894. Whole No. 73. 



Carlyle's Heroes and Hero Worship. 



BY PROF. J. A. M'DERMAD, A. M. 

The potenc}^ of an action is measured 
by its power to achieve results. Those 
men who have been most efficient in shap- 
ing the character of the world's history 
and progress have been the men who most 
clearly saw and most firmly grasped those 
potencies which stir the soul, direct the 
motives and influence the conduct of their 
fellow men. The men who have been 
most conspicuous and vigorous in thus 
directing human affairs are termed heroes. 
The aspect of the world in its past ages as 
well as in its present career presents a 
wide scope for the exercise of the talents 
and ingenuity of great men, to mould its 
civilization, directs its religion, promote 
its freedom, inspire its hopes, and crystal- 
jze its nascent energies into forms of 
beauty, efficiency and strength ; and a 
mighty factor these men have been too in 
working out the problems which have af- 
fected human welfare. The world is in- 
debted to them for much of that enthus- 
iasm which was able to grasp the strength 
of its opportunities, utilize the energy of its 
bidden resources, combine and consolidate 
«s unused talent, and lead it forward in 
wte highway of victory and success. It 
was this fact that was noticed bv Thomas 
J-arlyle and delineated by him in his work 
on Heroes and Hero Worship. 
I ~i e . are some w ho are destined to 
aa and influence others in the drama of 
for ' they . are able to fore cast events and 
esee hidden issues with a power sur- 
Hssing their fellow-men, and are thus by 
mature cmnlifiorl +~ „Ia a;~^4- rrui 

are 



qualified to rule and direct. They 
they 1 r sym P ath y with the age in which 
s Peak e ' to tnem s pi rit seems to 
lock i t0 them its secrets seem to be un- 
yield an< *- ^ eir hands its potencies 
a willing and ready obedience. 



They grasp the spirit of the time in 
which they live, and, imbued with its 
mighty energies, bid defiance to every- 
thing which opposed the onward sway of 
the principles which not only they but the 
age in general espoused. They illumin- 
ate the minds of other men, bind together 
their sympathies and direct their motives, 
and are the crystallizing centres around 
which the formative elements and govern- 
ing principles of human progress and en- 
deavor are collected and consolidated. 
They may sometimes stand alone, but 
they embody some controlling factor of 
human sympathy and advancement and 
cannot and will not be lost, although they 
may be obscured. They strike some 
chord of the human heart which will con- 
tinue to vibrate and resound on through 
coming generations, or, like the the statue 
of Memnon, is attuned anew by the ad- 
vancing light of each new day of truth. 
He says in the first paragraph of his 
work : "For, as I take it, universal his- 
tory, the history of what man has accom- 
plished in the world, is at bottom the 
history of the great men who have worked 
here. They were the leaders of men, these 
great men ; the modelers, patterns and in 
a wide sense creators of whatsoever the 
general mass of men continued to do or to 
attain ; all things that we see standing 
accomplished in the world are properly 
the outer material result, the practical 
realization and embodiment of the 
thoughts that dwell in the great men sent 
into the world ; the soul of the whole 
world's history, it may justly be consid- 
ered, were the history of these. " This 
statement may be a little overdrawn, yet 
it is true that the marshalling of affairs, 
the direction of great national and civil 
changes, and the centralization of power, 
talent and influence in the world's history 
is due to great men. Carlyle shows us 
his heroes to a large extent as projected 



98 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



on a screen of ideal perfection. The 
original classical conception of a hero 
was that of a demigod, and Carlisle seems, 
though half unconsciously, to have incor- 
porated that conception into his treat- 
ment of heroes and their place in the 
world. We see them indeed with the fea- 
tures and likenesses of men, but still as 
men whose form and influence is pro- 
jected on the exalted elevation of celestial 
canvas ; and irradiated by the light of a 
supernatural illumination. 

All forms of greatness pass in rapid 
succession before our mental vision under 
the glow of the impassioned ferver with 
which our author draws the bold design 
of his portraits of great men. He appre- 
hends the spirit of the age, and his mind 
with one impassioned glance takes into 
view in rapid succession the whole majes- 
tic scope of the converging features and 
forces which make up the history of an 
age or a nation, and with the hand of a 
master he paints for us the action of the 
invisible forces which lie behind the 
scene. A divine idea pervades the whole 
of his philosophy, and his sentiments are 
invariably grand, lofty and devout. He 
stands as it were continually on the 
threshold of the temple of infinite power, 
wisdom and light, and his sentiments as 
they are expressed in Heroes aud Hero 
Worship, are not those of the common- 
place or familiar, but invariably bear the 
stamp of an imagery that is exalted, re- 
fining and illustrious. His precepts are 
prompted b}>- no secondary or supercilious 
motives, but seem to be the result of an 
original and sublime inspiration of genius 
which gives them the stamp of a bold, 
lofty and creative imagery. We see the 
hero in two aspects of his being, first as a 
leader and controller of human affairs, and, 
secondly, in his inner life and nature, 
Carlyle shows us the elements and char- 
acteristics of his nature, those factors on 
which his greatness and success inhere, 
and on which his influence and leadership 
in the world depends. 

He first shows us the hero as divinity 
in the person of Odin. Here we are ad- 
mitted to the gorgeous and picturesque 
beauty of the Scandinavian mythology* 
Carlyle depicts in this chapter principally 
the universal tendency of mankind to 
worship some divinity, and the fact that 
with this tendency is arrayed the loftiest 
sentiments and purest emotions of which 
man is capable. It also stands to man as 



the keynote of the highest development 
of his nature, the loftiest impulses of hi s 
heart and the chief controlling element of 
his character. It is also the means by 
which he is to achieve the highest and 
best ends of his nature and lift himself to 
the true sphere which the Creator had in 
view in his endowment. It touches the 
profoundest springs of being and elicits 
the most potential elements of huma 
character. The finite demands the i 
finite, the dependent the unconditioned, 
and thus the requirements of man's 
nature demand that he worship a Being 
higher than himself — one removed be- 
yond the sphere and capacities o 
ordinary human nature. The law o_ 
ethics in man is written in the constitu- 
tion of exery human being and utters its 
imperatives with greater or less force, 
according to the degree of the individual 
apprehension and the state of his en- 
lightenment,. It may, where its mandates 
are perverted, even lead to a course of 
conduct which is entirely abnormal and 
at variance with its true design, still this 
argues nothing against its existence and 
the potency of its demand. It is an 
important factor in human nature and the 
degree and legitimacy of its exercise 
indicate the state of the individual en- 
lightenment and intelligence, also the 
moral state and condition of society. It 
has also been an important factor in shap- 
ing the moral and religious progress of 
nations and epochs of history and thus in 
promoting the general elevation and wel- 
fare of mankind. The ancient world even 
in its heather aspect reveals the coloring 
of the religious sentiment in a very 
marked degree, inasmuch as the worship 
of the Deities, the consultation of oracles 
and the various religious festivals and 
sacrifices formed one of the prominent 
features of their religion and a distinctive 
trait of national life. 

The Pagan religions and mythologies 
have in them the freshness and simplicity 
of youth, and for the most part correspond 
to the youthful character of Pagan know- 
ledge. To the Pagan mind the phenomena 
of the natural world are fall of sublime 
mystery, and it was and is the ardent de- 
sire of their minds to account for the ever 
recurring facts and changes which con- 
stantly engrossed their attention. They 
must assign some cause for the effects 
which everywhere encompassed them a nCl 
invaded their experience. 



THE COLLEGE JtORTJM. 



99 



The Norse mythology splendidly typi- 
fies this tendency of mankind to account 
for and explain the effects and phenomena 
of the natural world by adducing a super- 
natural cause inherent in nature. The 
Norse religion is in reality an allegory. 
Man represented nature as he felt it. He 
was intensely in earnest in striving to 
evolve the secret of nature's forces, and 
tried to spell out and interpret the signi- 
ficance of the manifold operations which 
he saw manifested about him in sea and 
earth and air and sky. Nature was to 
him a sublime imagery, a mysterious sym- 
bolism which spoke to him of the invisible 
and infinite, and under whose symbolic 
rapture he stood with mingled feelings of 
admiration and awe. This devout con- 
templation of the spiritual efficacy which 
men felt was concealed beneath the shift- 
ing panorama of outward phenomena, 
called forth feelings of devout veneration 
and reverence from the minds of its sin- 
cere and reverent beholders. The Norse 
mythology is grand, vigorous, sublime and 
energetic. It is like the place where its 
records have been kept, and rises, like Ice- 
land, majestically above the surrounding 
plain. Its characters are grotesque, pro- 
digious and towering, and personate the 
awful and imposing in nature. We see in 
them the powers of the struggling and 
surging elements portrayed, and they pos- 
sess a fervor, vindictiveness and rio-or 
which is well suited to the aspect of those 
northern climes. 
That Odin was a man we think, how- 

Sr 6 !' ^ quite im P r <>l>able. If he accom- 
plished any such brave feats as would lay 
jne foundation of the character ascribed 
life 1 i! n thdr s y stem of worship, it is 
L SOme vesti g e of his history 
would remain by means of which we 
J.wia: g am a clue to Mg descent- Car _ 

ma^K *t videntl y wrong in supposing that 
the , exalts a mere human being to 
fore!* ° f Chief divinit J- It would be 
this ti the S enius of anv nation to do 
rank J" S Y exalt him ^P^Hy to the 
no n V- ^ enates , or dens ex machina, but 
anv fl nH? n ?- f whose mycology we have 
man 1 C records has exalted a mere 
Wh e J°n P osi tion of chief divinity. 

that h7Ti yle fails in his theor ^ is this ' 
fact fh f to take c °gnizance of the 
reprei^ fcamon g heathen peoples the 
Wffel v k 0n 0f su Pernatural beings is 
th e i r in eidola i and that these gave to 
deas a strong anthropomorthic 



color; so much was this the case that 
their chief divinity came to be considered 
a man, but with supernatural attributes 
and powers. In fact, this anthromorphism 
is a kind of representation which charac- 
terizes and must charactize all our con- 
ceptions of a supernatural being. Per- 
haps in the course of time the symbolical 
form became detached from the concep- 
tion, and Odin came to be regarded as a 
mere man. Carlyle himself betrays his 
error in attempting to account for the 
manner in which a human being could be 
raised to the rank which Odin held. 
" How the man Odin came to be consid- 
ered thus ? That surely were a question 
which nobody would wish to dogmatize 
upon. I have said, his people knew no 
bounds to their admiration of him ; the}' 
as yet had no scale to measure admira- 
tion by. Fancy your own generous heart- 
love of some great man expanding until 
it transcended all bounds, till it filled 
and overflowed the whole field of your 
thought. " This hypothesis must fall to 
pieces under a rigid analysis. Man seeks 
the infinite and transcendent, but never 
in a fellow-being— a person of his own 
level. The mysteries of his own existence 
and the enigma of the universe require 
him to suppose a being of infinite power 
and resourses, exalted far above the 
sphere and capacities of anything he can 
know or see, an infinite being upon whom 
all the finite and material rests and is 
conditioned. But man does not and 
never can seek this infinite in mere man. 
Man may be a hero or a dolt, but he can- 
not hold supreme dominion and reverence 
in the hearts and affections of his fellows. 
Odin may be, and doubtless was in the 
estimation of the Norseman, a type of the 
true divinity which they knew must exist 
as a necessary condition of thought, and 
whom they portrayed in the symbolism 
of human attributes. 

{To be continued.) 



How dear to our heart is 

Cash on subscription, 
When the generous subscriber 

Presents it to view ; 
But the man who don't pay — 

We refrain from description, 
For, perhaps, gentle reader, 

That man might be you. 

— Chatham, N. T., Courier. 



100 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The Newspaper as an Educator. 

The editor is the great American school- 
master; he gives his lessons more fre- 
quently than any other teacher, and they 
cost less. To the newspaper the majority 
of students are indebted for the only post- 
graduate course they ever receive. Many 
others would have no education at all 
were it not for what they read in the news- 
papers. 

The newspaper is the universal college, 
any one can get an education there for a 
penny or two. The newspaper is the only 
biographer and historian which the mass 
of people can read. It gives more informa- 
tion for a given amount of money than 
the cheapest circulating library in the 
world. Thinkers who are concerned 
chiefly for the good of the community 
are alwa}^s the men who esteem the news- 
paper most highly. Wendell Phillips 
said, " Let me make the newspapers, and 
I care not what is preached in the pulpit." 

Thomas Jefferson, one of the founders 
of our government, said, " Were it left to 
me to decide whether we should have a 
government without newspapers, or news- 
papers without a government, 1 should 
prefer the latter." Public opinion can be 
created more rapidly by daily appeals and 
arguments which the newspaper reader 
can quietly look over by himself, pausing 
whenever he may like to think over what 
he has read, than anything that can appear 
in campaigm speeches or magazine essays 
or books by the most noted writers and 
specialists. Years ago Lamartine was 
laughed at as a dreamer when he said, 
" Newspapers will ultimately engross all 
literature; there will be nothing else pub- 
lished but newspapers." His prophecy is 
being rapidly fulfilled. The newspaper is 
invading every department of literature, 
and giving the reader the best at the low- 
est price. It begins to look as if the time 
might come when lawyers, courts, jurors, 
judges, would all be supplanted by the 
newspapers. So general is the resort to 
newspapers for information and opinion 
that it sometimes becomes very difficult 
to procure jurors for a case in court. 
Whitelaw Reid, editor of the New York 
Tribune, said, " Every great newspaper 
represents an intellectual, a moral and a 
material growth — the accretion of success- 
ive efforts from year to year — until it has 
become an institution and a power." 

Horace Greeley, the founder of Mr. 



Reid's paper, said, " The office of a news- 
paper is first to give the history of its 
time, and afterwards to deduce such the- 
ories or truths from it as shall be of uni- 
versal application. The newspaper in 
general gives information on current 
events. If any new star is found, when 
bills are passed in Congress, if there is 
war in any part of world, the people all 
know it ; but how do they find it out ? It 
cannot be recorded in history in so short 
a time. It is through the newspaper, the 
great historian of current events, which 
furnishes history as history is made. 
Some people believe nothing except what 
they read in their own newspaper. 

The newspaper has a great influence in 
the home. The child is first taught by 
its parents, then in the Sabbath school as 
well as in the secular schools, but that is 
not its only education ; into the home come 
newspapers from which it learns. The old 
saying, " Because my father is a Repub- 
lican or a Democrat I am one also," is 
more than sentiment, more truth in it than 
poetry ; the newspaper taken into that 
home created that sentiment and formu- 
lated the political creed. The Republi- 
can will take a Republican paper; the 
Democrat the paper belonging to his party. 
This paper is read in that home and is the 
principal factor in directing his political 
opinions. So also in referance to his re- 
ligious belief, the saying, "Because my 
father is a Lutheran or a United Brethren, 
I am one," is not the whole truth ; in that 
home the church paper, of whatever de- 
nomination it may be, is wielding its in- 
fluence. The religious paper had a great 
influence in creating sentiment towards 
closing the World's Fair gates on the 
Sabbath ; even if it did not succeed in clos- 
ing them, it succeeded in keeping away 
some who respected the Sabbath. Since 
the newspaper has such a great influence 
it certainly has a vast opportunity i fl 
doing good. Some one has said, " Th e 
possibilities of the press for good, now 
that independence in journalism is practi- 
cable, cannot be over-estimated." 

Charles 

A. Dana, editor of the New York Suh 
once said, " The legal responsibility °| 
newspapers is a reality, but their mora 
responsibility is greater and more imp OI J 
ant." George William Curtis, the late ed- 
itor of Harper's Weekly, said, " If ^fj 
newspaper is the school of the people, an 
if upon popular education and intellig er J c ^ 
the success and prosperity of popui a 



TEE COLLEGE FORUM. 



101 



government depends, there is no function 
in society which requires more conscience 
as well as ability." Therefore its great re- 
sponsibility is to furnish the people with 
good, pure reading matter, such as will 
help them to form correct opinions on 
great and important questions, social, poU 
litical, religious ; arouse sentiments of pa- 
triotism, devotion to country, home and 
church; and lead to purity of life and 
character in all our intercourse between 
man and man. Mary Richard, '91. 



Education and Life. 



PROP. E. W. RUNKLE, PH.D. 

The dogma has been proclaimed for 
ages, " Education is a preparation for 
life." Upon this text two representative 
schools have discoursed. On the one 
hand, the advocates of the classics have 
so far elevated education as relatively to 
ignore its relation to life. On the other, 
the cry for " preparation " has given birth 
to such practical efforts as to cease to de- 
serve the term education. As a result (if 
we wish to be slightly cynical), we have 
all education pitted against all life; the 
ultra-classicist, so educated as not to be 
prepared for life ; the bread and butter 
specialist, so prepared for life as not to be 
educated. In short, we have separated 
by abstraction and embodied in institu- 
tions what should be conjoined. So also, 
m work and happiness, religious and 
secular, private and official, life here and 
hereafter, we have falsely abstracted from 
the real unity and solidarity with which 
live our days. 

The one thought, then, which I would 
seek to impress is this: Education is 
^ry life itself. In partial justification, 
™e following may be noted : Divergencies 

character and living are owing not so 
much to external factors as to internal 
lactors. A fish is not "fishy" because it 
naabits the sea; nor would man (barring 
Physical impossibilities) be a fish could 

Th ni?- 6 himself in flsn environment. 
Chinaman is such whether in Canton, 
onclon, Paris or San Francisco, while 
^ Ashman of Cork is still a Cork Irish- 
of p ll m tno »gh he may be a policeman 

We n? l That is ' [t is j" st as true that 
as n ourselves what we are to become, 

real We are made what we are - Tne 
tion ^°T er to k e insisted upon in educa- 
an d life is self-determination. We 



are not chameleons, reflecting the colors 
with which we come into chance contact. 
We are not wholly creatures of circum- 
stance; circumstances are our creatures. 
Not always are we waiting for something 
to turn up ; we are frequently engaged in 
turning something up. 

It is this latter conception of life — that 
is, that conception in which man is recog- 
nized as playing the chief role — that we 
affirm to be equivalent to education. Man 
molding himself, choosing and altering his 
environment, establishing society and in- 
stitutions, realizing moral and religious 
truths — this is education and this is life. 

An oyster is forever an oyster because 
of oyster nature, — that is, the oyster is 
simply what it is; man, on the contrary, 
is simply what he is not. Education, then, 
might be defined as a process of making 
an individual what he is not. When such 
a process ceases, not only education ends, 
but life as well. A " finished" education 
is soul-suicide, more disastrous by far than 
the destruction of the body. Even plants 
must be improved by cultivation, animals 
by domestication , but man is the only 
being in all creation that is subject to edu- 
cation. Any other use of the term is a 
misuse of it. Passivity marks the two 
former; self-activity characterizes the 
latter. 

Education, then, is life's dealing with 
life. Life is conquest of itself. As Goethe 
has so truly said, — 

"He only earns his freedom and existence, 
Who daily conquers them, anew." 

There is a whole theory of life and educa- 
tion in these words. Free existence by 
daily conquest, self-mastery by self-disci- 
pline, the continued making of the "ought" 
and the "is" in one's life meet as friends, 
in short, self-obeclient and self-regulative 
personality, such is the aggressive purpose 
and mission of life and of education as 
well. " Man shall not live by bread alone" 
is an educational principle, as well as a 
gospel utterance, and any conception of 
education which fails to recognize and 
make provision for the growth of man's 
real self — that is, his legal spontaneity— is 
radically vicious. You can " make" ani- 
mals tame; dogs do tricks ; but a man you 
must grow. 

So that the maxim of Rousseau, " Fol- 
low nature," must be supplanted by the 
psychological maxim, " Grow a nature 
which follows you." We have had the 
gospel of molded, shaped and fashioned 



102 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



minds preached long enough. We need 
some Peter the Hermit to herald the active 
side of education ; minds molding, shaping 
and fashioning themselves ; of life itself 
conforming to purposes and plans which 
the self, in its educating progress, decrees. 
Evolution has played havoc in educational 
lines, and we shall not see the return of 
better days until we bow out our chests, 
set our teeth, and clinch our fists in asser- 
tion of the self-regnancy of every indi- 
vidual consciousness. 

"Nature retains her veil despite our clamors ; 

That which she doth not willingly reveal, 
Cannot be wrenched from her by levers, screws 
and hammers." 

The fact is, education is not a mechani- 
cal problem. Given a man's parents, him- 
self and his environment, you cannot 
predict his character. Each individual 
approaches life with the personal equation 
" on board," but not in sight. It consti- 
tutes a sort of unknown cargo, marked for 
some unknown port, but whose contents 
and destination it is the very task of life 
and education to decipher. Thus viewed, 
education is life's adjustment of itself ; and 
life, the growing discover}' of self-educa- 
tion. To a full realization of this unity, 
of education in life, and of life in educa- 
tion, were the words, " All things are 
yours," spoken. — The Watchword. 



September. 

I am for the cooler breezes, 

Cooler breezes of the fall ; 
Which dance with tingling sneezes, 

At the bleak Autumnal ball. 

I am for the weirdsome death-note, 

Of each sadly falling leaf; 
As it breaks the band which held held it, 

Through its life, so cruelly brief. 

I am for the gentle rain-drop, 

With its restless little feet ; 
As it skips upon the house-top, 

With a step that's very neat. 

I am for the blushing fruit-trees, 

With their faces all aglow 
In the bloom of such rich tint-lines, 

Human art could ne'er bestow. 

I am for the frosty morning, 
With its robes of silv'ry white ; 

Which the sun doth turn to tear-drops, 
Long before the fall of night: 

I am for the chilly ev'nings, 
Growing more so day by day ; 

Which induces the sweetest slumbers, 
In their own inviting way. 



I am for each gaysome fancy, 
Of the Autumn's every swell ; 

As it rises high and higher, 
Rolling over hill and dell. 
Norman Colestock Schlichter, '97. 



Charge on the School Brigade. 

Six hundred feet ! six hundred feet ! 

Six hundred feet onward ! 

Over the barnyard fence, strode the five runners. 

Forward the school brigade ! 

"I'll charge on every one," he said ; 

Around the barnyard fence 

Fled the five runners. 

Forward the school brigade ! 
Every boy was dismayed. 
Did not the drunkard know 
Some one had hollered "whoa !" 
There's no time to make reply. 
There's no time to reason why, 
There's but to run or die ; 
Over the barnyard fence 
Jumped the five runners. 

Ladies in rear of them, 
Citizens to left of them, 
School boys in front of them, 
Cheered and wondered. 
Loud behind them curses fell, 
Cowardly they ran, and well — 
Away from the jaws of death, 
To where — he could not tell— 
Sped the five runners. 

Ran they all with heads so bare, 

Ran they all and split the air. 

Ran from the drunkard there, 

Away from danger, while every one wondered. 

Plunged through the rising smoke, 

Right from the threatened stroke 

Mayer, Shisler, Grove, Enders and Guyer, 

Spluttered and blundered. 

Then they came back — but not 

Not the five runners. 

Ladies in rear of them, 
Citizens to left of them, 
School boys in front of them, 
Yelled and wondered. 
Still around them curses fell, 
Escaped the dangerous spell, 
They that had run so well, 
Came from the jaws of death. 
Then they their perils tell, 
All that was left of them — 
Left of the five runners. 

When will their willows fade ? 
Oh, the swift run they made ! 
All the town wondered ! 
Shame on the run they made ! 
Shame on the school brigade ! 
Timid five runners. 

Walter G. Clipfinger- 



1 want to be an angel 

Sang the Freshman in his pride ; 
He fell from a cross-bar, 

And his wish was gratified. — Ex. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



103 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
John H. Matsilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

W alter G. Clipfinger, '99. 



EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

Xorman C. Sleichter, '97. 



ALUMM EIUTOR. 
Prof. John E. Lehman, A. M., '74. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Societs'— Miss Estella Stehman, '96. 
Philofcosmian Society— VV. Elmer Heilman. 
Kalozetean Society — 



THK COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-five cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Efcttorial. 



Welcome, thrice welcome to the new 
students. 



We are glad to see so much musical 
talent among the students this term. We 
would suggest that a glee club or an 
orchestra, or both, be organized. Such 
musical organizations would be most de- 
sirable and profitable. 



The Sunbeam Publishing Company, of 
Philadelphia, Pa., will remove its plant to 
°ur beautiful town by the first of Novem- 
ber. A very commodious building is 
in course of construction but a short 
^stance from the College, on White Oak 
street. We are delighted to have this 
Dew enterprise come to our midst. A 
tt °re desirable place could not have been 
selected. 



Since vacation we have heard of per- 
sons Wh 1 

larl n0t receive the FoRUM re g"- 

ca 1? lately we have been unusually 

full Witl1 the mailin S list > having care- 
car ^ reV ' Sed iL There is a Possibility of 
w e essness in the mails. . Those who do 
ve the Forum regularly in the j 



not 



recei 



month of publication will greatly favor us 
by dropping a card. Hereafter we shall 
make an effort to get the paper out by the 
15th, so that it will reach all subscribers 
before the 20th of each month. 



The Opening. 

The large chapel of the College was 
well filled with students, their friends, and 
visitors on the morning of September 4th, 
the formal opening of the twenty-ninth 
year of the institution. After the singing 
of an appropriate hymn, led by Professor 
Lehman, President Bierman read the 
thirteenth chapter of I. Corinthians, made 
a few suggestive comments on the same, 
and then offered a fervent prayer in the 
interest of all present and the success of 
the work in hand. Another hymn was 
sung, followed with prayer by the Rev. 
Solomon L. Swartz, of Middletown, a 
prominent trustee and a liberal friend of 
the College. At the close of these in- 
teresting devotional exercises the Presi- 
dent delivered a very fitting address of 
welcome. The intense anxiety felt by 
those who spent the vacation in canvas- 
sing for students can be felt only by those 
engaged in the work, but now the hour of 
relief has come, and in this instance the 
result is gratifying. The old students 
were congratulated on their prompt re- 
turn, and the many new ones, enrolled for 
the first time, were most heartily welcomed. 
To be connected with any educational in- 
stitution as a student is a favor, but to be 
under the fostering care and tuition of a 
Christian College is a benediction. 

To learn to read Greek, to construe 
Latin, to solve problems in calculus, and 
to evolve the abstruse conclusions in 
chemistry, affords a discipline of mind 
which may well be coveted. 

The aim of the College is high; it seeks 
to educate and draw forth all that is 
potentially in man, the training of all the 
energies and capacities of his being to the 
highest pitch and directing them to their 
true ends. From 3 T ear.to year it has sent 
out cts graduates to make the world better 
and be a blessing to themselves. Our 
work compares favorably with the best in 
the land. Now, let each seek to make an 
honorable record on the professor's class 
book, and make for himself a name and 
win a place in the affections of his associ- 
ates. 



104 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The address was well received. 

The attendance is considerably in ad- 
vance of last year. 

Besides large accessions to the music 
and preparatory departments, one was 
added to the Senior class, one to the 
Junior and two to the Sophomore. The 
Freshman class numbers about fifteen this 
year. 



Our New Teachers. 

Miss Anna M. Thompson, Ph. B., who 
takes the place of Miss Sleichter as 
Preceptress and Professor of Modern 
Languages, is a lady of varied accomplish- 
ments. After finishing a course in Otter- 
hein University and taking the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy she entered upon 
a full course in a business college and 
studied typewriting and shorthand as 
well as double-entry bookkeeping and 
business correspondence. Recently she 
spent several months at Asbury Park, 
N. J., under a specialist in studying the 
French and German languages. She is 
a woman of modest demeanor, kind dis- 
position, yet firm, and by her amiable 
qualities wins friends readily, and we be- 
speak for her a successful career among 
us. 

Miss Anna R. Forney, A. B., Class of 
'92, was recently elected to the position of 
Professor of Harmony. Miss Forney is 
personally known to most of the readers 
of The Forum, and hence little need be 
said. She is a woman of fine presence, 
superior musical gifts and thorough train- 
ing ; and possessing all the elements that 
make up the successful instructor, we feel 
confident she will not disappoint her 
friends. 

Oscar Ellis Good, A. B., Class of '94, is 
called to fill the position of Adjunct Pro- 
fessor of Natural Science, and in the ab- 
sence of Professor Shott takes charge of 
that department. Prof. Good is a young 
man of fine discriminating powers, excel- 
lent judgment and scholarship; and, as he 
stood in the front rank of his class while 
a student, we have no doubt he will soon 
rise to the front rank in his chosen pro- 
fession. 



The Lecture Course. 

The Lecture Committee of the P. L. S. 
has announced the course for the coming 
season. This is the eleventh course that 
this society has brought before the 



students and patrons of the College, a 
not only has the high standard of t 
previous courses been maintained, but t 
committee feels confident that the enter- 
tainments provided for the ensuing year 
are superior to any engaged heretofore, 
Though in a time when the friends of this 
institution feel the effects of " Hard 
Times " most keenly, their liberal support 
and kindly appreciation of previous efforts 
were incentives to procure, if possible, a 
course of entertainments affording uni- 
versal instruction and unadulterated 
amusement. That the committee has suc- 
ceeded, the following is proof. 

On November 2, the Original Swedish 
Ladies' Quartette will open the course by 
one of their unique entertainments. This 
company comprises Misses Hednig Lid- 
stron, first soprano; Maria Heden, second 
soprano; Stephanie Heden, first alto, and 
Amelie Heden, second alto. They ap- 
pear in the picturesque costume of 
their native provinces of Sweden, and are 
seemingly equally at home in English, 
Swedish, French and German. This is a 
company of modest young women who are 
not straining to produce a sensation, but 
whose singing affords an enduring 
pleasure. Three of the ladies are magnifi- 
cent soloists, possessing voices of wonder- 
ful range and cultivation. As a quartette 
a more perfect ensemble of voices can not 
be within any entertainment. They area 
genuine success. 

The second entertainment will be an 
illustruted lecture by Rev. G. W. Stevens, 
November 30th. Rev. Stevens has gained 
an enviable reputation as an illustrat' 
lecturer. At all the great Chautau 
assemblies during the past few years 
has drawn immense crowds. His subj 
will be " Switzerland," This lecture 
be of special interest to all lovers 
nature as well as to the student of history- 
Switzerland, the land of the free and the 
home of the Alps. 

" Those palaces of nature whose vast walls 
Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalp 8 ) 
And throned eternity in icy halls 
Of cold sublimity, where forms and falls ^ 
The avalanche — the thunderbolt of snow. 

This lecture is a vivid and intellig eIlt 
description of Switzerland, and a naos 
fascinating trip to the Matterhorn. . 

On December 13, Lovett's Boston St*J 
will render one of their delightful «" 
inimitable concerts. The phenome 
success of this company has earned f° 



9 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 105 



the enviable title " Boston's Great Popular 
Concert Company." It is composed of 
]\Iiss Marion Osgood, Boston's star 
violinist; Miss Clara Gr. Warner, Boston's 
star ballad singer ; Miss Bertha Brewer, 
Boston's star reader and accompanist, and 
Mr. Frank G. Reynold's, Boston's star 
unique singing humorist. Miss Osgood 
has no superior as either violinist or 
pianist. Miss Warner always entrances the 
audience with her ballads. Miss Brewer is 
unapproachable as reciter and reader, and 
Mr. Reynolds convulses everybody with 
a number of his humorous drolleries. 
Lovett's Boston Stars is one of the few 
first-class concert companies, and its suc- 
cess is genuine. 

The fourth entertainment is a lecture 
January 23, and will be delivered by Col. J. 
P. Sanford, who is recognized as the great- 
est traveller, living or dead, having crossed 
the Atlantic nineteen times, and is a man 
who never travels a mile without seeing 
something. Through North and South 
America, through Europe, Asia and 
Africa, this veteran traveller has pushed 
his way until, as he declares, he has been 
in every kingdom and republic under the 
sun. His subject will be " Old Times and 
New," and in it the Colonel, drawing 
from his vast fund of information, illus- 
trates that, while the past with its mystery 
and Pyramids and Sphinx excites our 
wonder, the present challenges our admira- 
tion. That he has lectured over 900 
nights during the last five years is suffi- 
cient evidence that he amuses, instructs 
and entertains. Though he lectures for 
two hours, the universal sentiment is that 
It is too brief." A better testimonial 
can not be written. 

On February 22 Mr. Harry M. Peckham 
*dl close the course with his renowned 
1 Humorous Monologue " — humor, whist- 
hng, imitation and song. Mr. Peckham's 
^cord as a humorous entertainer is a most 
enviable one. His " Whistling Proposal " 
ls unparalleled. 

Notwithstanding the superior, and con- 
sequently the more expensive, talent that 
tfl e committee has to offer, they have not 
enhanced the price of season tickets, but 
^ner the course of these five entertain- 
ments for $1.15. 



Personal. 

d The Rev. Charles Roads, State Presi- 
ent of the Societies of Christian En- 



deavor and pastor of a leading Methodist 
congregration in the city of Philadelphia, 
spent a day with his cousin, President 
Bierman, last week. Mr. Roads was a 
student in this institution twenty years 
ago, and, after reviewing the College prem- 
ises and its equipments, expressed him- 
self highly pleased with the great advance 
made since then. In the evening of the 
same day he addressed a large meeting of 
Christian Endeavorers in the Trinity TJ. 
B. church at Lebanon. 



"College Bay Collections." 

EAST PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 

Annville, $52.03 

Lititz, 3.00 

Columbia, 9.29 

Ephrata, 3.47 

Lebanon, 10.58 

Mount Joy, 6.00 

New Holland, 5.40 

Mountville, 17.31 

Reading — Otterbein, 4.00 

Hummelstown, 9.60 

Paradise, 13.75 

Lancaster, 4.00 

Lancaster Circuit, 5.00 

Oberlin, 4.00 

Union Circuit, 5.00 

Manheim Circuit, 2.33 

$154.76 

PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 

Otterbein, Harrisburg ('93), $13.00 

Memorial, Harrisburg ('93), 13.38 

Memorial, Harrisburg ('94), 9.91 

Rocky Spriug ('93), 14.00 

Rocky Spring ('94), 9.50 

York Circuit, 9.00 

Bendersville, 3.74 

New Cumberland, 5.75 

Shiremanstown, 6.58 

York— First Church, 17.01 

York— Third Church, 3.26 

Baltimore— Scott St. , 1 1 • 00 

Chambersburg, 25.00 

$141.13 

EAST GERMAN CONFERENCE. 

Reading — Salem, $7.10 

Myerstown, 4.50 

$11.60 

MARYLAND CONFERENCE. 

Frederick, $4.00 

Washington, D. C, 13.35 

$17.35 

PERSONAL. 

J. H. Kurtz, $1.00 

Total, $325.84 



106 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PBESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 

JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 

ANNA M. THOMPSON, Ph., B., 
Professor of English Literature. 
OSCAR ELLIS GOOD, A. B., 
Adjunct Professor of Natural Science. 
CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 

ANNA R. FORNEY, A. B., 
Professor of Harmony. 

URBAN H. HERSHEY, 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN, 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, President. 
Miss ELLA BLACK, Secretary. 

KAL OZETEAN. 
HARRY W. MAYER, President. 
LESLIE G. ENDERS, Secretary. 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 
IRA E. ALBERT, President. 
HARVEY E. RUNKLE, Secretary. 
Y. M. C. A. 

JOHN H. MAYSILLES, President. 
JAY W. YOE, Secretary. 

T. W. G. A. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, President. 
Miss CARRIE FLINT, Secretary. 



Clionian Literary Society. 



Virtute et Fide. 

The first meeting of this school year 
was held the first Friday evening of the 
term. It consisted of a business meeting 
only, no program having been prepared. 
The second week, however, a very inter- 
esting program was well rendered. 



We realize that with the class of '94 
many of our most active workers have 
left us ; but those that remain seem 
determined to obtain all the good they 
possibly can by taking an active part in 
the work, and with the help of our new 
members, we expect to make the year a 
grand success. We would heartily wel. 
come any of the ex-Clinonians to our 
regular meetings held every Friday even- 
ing. 

Miss Mary Keller and Misses Adclie 
and May Light joined society on the 14th. 
We hope to add several more names to 
our list before the month closes. 

Miss Kin ports and Miss Bender visited 
us on the 14th. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma non sine pidvere. 

Our work for. this term is very en- 
couraging. Our first session consisted of 
speeches from each member relating the 
summer's experience. 

Each one seemed glad to once more 
cross the threshold of the old K. L. S. 
Home and expressed a desire to be more 
consecrated to the work in every depart- 
ment of the society. 

Mr. Jas. Zug, '94, was with us and gave 
us a neat speech in which he expressed 
his regrets on severing the ties which 
bound him in active membership to the 
society, but left with us his best wishes. 
He will soon leave for Iowa, where he 
will fill a position in a R. R. office. 

G-. A. L. Kindt, '94, is attending the 
Ohio State University at Athens, Ohio. 
His work is in the Natural Science De- 
partment. He writes that his work is 
pleasant and his surroundings agreeable. 
Mr. Kindt is a thorough student and an 
honor to the society as well as his class. 

Our second session of society was 
profitable and showed an earnest desire 
for culture, on the part of each member. 

The visitors who met in session were 
the Daugherty Bros., Messrs. Sam. Saylor, 
John D. Stehman and Frank Shisler. 
The same evening Mr. Shisler joined the 
society. 

The gymnasium has been put in con- 
dition for those who wish to take indoor 
exercise. The charges will be moderate 
for the remainder of this term. 

Again we welcome all friends to our 
I meetings which are held in our hall from 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



10T 



time to time, and especially our ex-mem- 
]j e rs who are not far distant. 

We are always glad to have our ex- 
members with us, and give us words of 
encouragement which are appreciated by 
each individual member, so that we may 
strive onward with more determined 
efforts, and our motto " Palma Non Sine 
Pulvere " always with us. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 

The P. L. S. enters upon the work of 
the year with the determination to be true 
to our motto. The first meeting of the 
term was held on Friday evening, Sep- 
tember the 7th, when a regular program 
was rendered in a very creditable manner. 
A large number of the new students were 
present and expressed themselves as well 
pleased. During the business session 
which followed the program, we were 
reminded that the spirit of Philokos- 
mianism had not left our ranks, and when 
the propositions of members and initiation 
came we were more convinced that the 
characteristic spirit and zeal was on the 
increase, and when the good old song 
rolled out from the very depth of the soul 
and filled the whole community with en- 
thusiasm and inspiration, our spirits 
fairly trickled over with glee and exulta- 
tion, and the scenes of former years 
flashed across our minds, and we realize 
that " it is good for us to be here." At 
°ur second meeting there was but a repe- 
tition of the enthusiasm, with the addi- 
tion that the "boys" were so jubilant 
tu at at the close of the session they 
gathered in front of the building and gave 
m cheering accents the Philo yell, closing 
Wl th the inspiring and noble song. A 
number of the new students took advan- 
a §e of the opportunity and joined our 
nks. The following persons were added 
10 the list of members : 

A - P. Grove, C. H. Snoke, W. G. Clip- 
Pnger, E. P. Anthony, A. S. Light, 
g a8 ,on Snoke, G. A. Ulrich, Edwin 
Irf? 1 .' John Q- Deibler, John R. Geyer 
an « Allen Baer. 
*be society will conduct 
ring the coming year 



a lecture 
We hope 



th 

will fli - ends and P atrons of tlie society 
give us the most hearty support. 
ow a i° C(Hlnt °f the course will appear in 
0a °ther column. 



Mr. Geo. H. Stein has entered the 
freshman class at Franklin and Marshall 
College, Mr. I. G. Hoerner entered Dick- 
inson College. While we are sorry to 
lose these earnest and active members we 
wish both success in the work in their 
respective institutions. 

We are pleased to note that Charles 
Sleichter and Harry Heberly, former 
members, have returned and are taking 
active work in the society. 

W. H. Kreider, '94, and O. E. Good, 
'94, paid the society a visit on the 14th 
inst., and spoke words of encouragement 
and praise which were well received as 
coming from two of our most faithful 
members while the}' were at College. 

We have renewed quite a number of 
newspapers and magazines for the read- 
ing-room, and additions will be made from 
time to time. Let each student patronize 
this department, as the benefits derived 
are extremely valuable to the student. 



A Pleasing Social Event. 

On Saturday evening, September 8, the 
parlors of the Ladies' Hall were the scene 
of brilliant social animation. The occa- 
sion was none other than a delightful 
reception to the new students, tendered 
by the Young Men's and Young Women's 
Christian Associations of the College. 
The reception committee, Miss Stehman 
and Mr. Maysilles, received each guest 
with a welcoming hand-shake, which 
caused all to feel perfectly at home. 

The playing of games and indulgence 
in friendly intercourse very quickly and 
pleasantl}' whiled the hours away. 

After the most luscious fruits of the 
season were served, and a reluctant good 
night said, the students sought their 
couches with the desire that these events 
would occur quite frequently. S. 



Y. M. C. A. Notes. 



Of all the opening exercises in the vari- 
ous departments of the College, the Sab- 
bath afternoon meeting of the Y. M. C. 
A. was the most impressive and indicated 
a strong current of earnest spirituality 
coursing through the hearts of those 
present. 

The meeting was conducted by Mr. J. 
H. Maysilles. The topic selected was 
" The purpose of Daniel," Dan. 1. 

On Saturday evening, Sept. 15, the 



108 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



missionery meeting was held, conducted 
by Mr. D. Buddinger. Scripture Lesson, 
Hebrews 8 : 10-13. 

Mr. Clarence S. Mclntire, of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, visited us on the 
18th inst., in the interest of the work. 
He conducted an earnest and impressive 
consecration service, after which he con- 
ducted a meeting of the Christian young 
men of the College in the interest of Bible 
study. He dwelt especially upon the ad- 
vantages of personal work and the need 
of special preparation by the study of the 
life and methods of Christ himself. Mr. 
Mclntire won the friendship and esteem 
of many of the young men, and was 
pleased with the interest manifested in 
the work. He conducted the chapel ser- 
vices the following morning. 

A large number of the new students 
joined at the earliest opportunity. May 
it be our privilege soon to see all in the 
Y. M. C. A. 

The Y. M. C. A. membership ought to 
be a mighty factor in the week of prayer, 
to point those without Christ to a better 
and nobler life. 

Is it necessary that a single one of our 
number continues to live on in sin dur- 
ring this year ? 

A true, God-fearing, consistent life has 
an influence that the devil can not with- 
stand. Brethren, let us live that during 
this campaign. 



The Maryland Reunion. 

The sixth annual reunion of the Mary- 
land students of Lebanon Valley College 
was held at Keedysville, Md., August^. 
A large number of graduates, students 
and ex-students were present. The IT. B. 
church in which the reunion was held 
was elaborately decorated with cut and 
potted flowers. The program, boch mus- 
ical and literary, was of a very hio-h 
order, and its perfect rendition was highly 
complimented by the press and the large 
audience. The remarkable success is at- 
tributed to the interest those took who 
were on the program. 

The kindness and hospitality of the 
people of Keedysville will long be remem- 
bered by those present. 



Tender-handed stroke a nettle, 
And it stings you for your pains ; 

Grasp it like a man of mettle, 
And it soft as silk remains.—//^. 



Personals and Locals. 

The largest class in the Bible Normal 
Union has been organized in the history 
of the College. ^ 

Boys, remember that our faculty and 
townspeople are positively opposed to the 
sound of tin horns, even at a baseball 
game. 

The lower Latin classes this term are 
the largest for many years. Some of the 
other classes had to be divided because of 
their large size. 

We are glad to welcome into our midst 
again, Charles H. Sleichter, of Scotland 
Pa., and Harry H. Heberly, of Mt. Wolf 
Pa., who enter the Junior class. 

Miss Flora Maysilles, of Frederick, Md., 
who was a student here last term, will be 
on the programme of the Y. P. C. U. Con- 
vention held in Washington, D. C, Octo- 
ber 5th, 6th and 7th. 

Miss Mary B. Sleichter, our former pre- 
ceptress, now teaching in Harrisburg, ac- 
companied by Miss Barton, also a teacher 
in that city, visited friends at the College 
on the 15th and 16th inst. 

Among the visitors at the College dur- 
ing the opening were the President of the 
Board of Trustees, Mr. D. W. Crider,of 
York, Pa. ; Rev. M. J. Mumma, soliciting 
agent of the College ; Mr. Bender, of Dills- 
burg, Pa., and Rev. L. L. Swartz, of Mid- 
dletown, Pa. 

Many of the boys left last spring full of 
enthusiasm for the book business, but 
have returned saying that they have 
enough of it forever. Perhaps they have, 
until next spring, when some glib-tongued 
General Agent comes around again and 
draws them in. 

Prof. J. A. Shott, who has charge of 
the National Science Department, has been 
granted a leave of absence for a fei* 
months by the Executive Committee, d 
ing which time he is taking a special 
course in chemistry at the University of 
Ohio. 0. E. Good, A. B., has been elected 
Adjunct Professor in his stead. 

How truly has Garfield said that 
" character is both a result and a cause- 
a result of influence and a cause of 
suits." The young man while at College 
should act wisely, for the years at sooo° 
are great factors in character. God hi 
made your capacity. You make y ' 
character. True men are neither mai 
or ruled by circumstances. 



I 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



109 



Alumni. 

>94 ? Win. H. Kreider has entered the 
tory law department at Yale. 

'92, John D. Rice has recently been ad- 
mitted to the bar at Chambersburg, Pa. 

'94, Samuel F. Huber enters the law 
department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

'94, Geo. A. L. Kindt is taking a post- 
graduate course in chemistry at the Ohio 
University. 

'94, James F. Zug in a few weeks will 
go to Iowa, where he will be engaged in a 
railroad office. 

'80, V. K. Fisher delivered an address 
before the Y. P. C. IT. Convention at 
Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

'91, John W. Owen is filling the pulpit 
of the Otterbein Memorial Church, Fred- 
erick, Mcl., during the illness of the pas- 
tor, Rev. Maysilles. 

'89, Reno S. Harp, editor of the 
Frederick Examiner, passed a most 
creditable law examination and has been 
admitted to the bar in Frederick, Md. 

'94, D. S. Eshleman, who so acceptably 
lias served the First U. B. church at 
York, Pa., for the past six months, will 
enter Union Biblical Seminary this fall. 

'94, Miss Maggie Strickler, who has 
been in ill health during the summer, is 
rapidly recovering. Her visit to the Col- 
lege this term was enjoyed by her many 
friends. 

94, Geo. K. Hartman during the past 
summer served the U. B. congregation at 
Red Lion, Pa. He was compelled to 
resign on account of ill health. His many 
mends will be glad to learn that he is 
convalescing. 



The Model Teacher. 

U TT 

f j Was an amiable man. He was 
J°nd of me, and I loved him." This is 
Dj 6 ^ as °n given by the venerable poet, 
u'a • °^ mes ? why one of his instructors 
w influence with him. Here is a truth 
ed«J * 18 Very fundamental. A knowl- 
relfr just how the mind works, of the 
most 53 ° f P erce P ts and concepts, of the 
scie extensive knowledge possible of 
Poss ° e and P mios °phy> the teacher may 
that V S ' but if he is with °ut that virtue 

so f a . the child t0 llim ' his teacnin g> 
r a s it touches motive or develops 



power, is very near zero — certainly but 
the tinkling of a cymbal. So that we 
have no hesitation in saying that she or 
he who has not this gift had better be 
earning his living in some other way than 
that of labor among youthful minds. 
And this is no cant. We do not believe 
in mere sentimentalism, and we have no 
patience with that hypocrisy that talks 
about the "dear children," and, at the 
same time, sees always the shining dollar 
in everything he does in their behalf. 
Neither do we admire very much that 
equally sickly sentiment that would drive 
from the school-room all earnest work, on 
the ground that work is drudgery and 
childhood is the period for play — and we 
might add, to complete the thought, of 
shirking burdens. But we do believe 
that teaching means influence, that the 
imparting of knowledge is merely inci- 
dental, and that there can be little influ- 
ence with the youthful mind unless there 
is between teacher and child that cer- 
tain mysterious power — call it what you 
please — that binds heart to heart, and, 
therefore, mind to mind. — Educator. 



"Unprinted Words." 

The Ladies' Home Journal has given 
its readers selections from Henry Ward 
Beecher's " Unprinted Words." Of he- 
redity he says : " It seems hard that when 
a man does wrong his children should be 
put under almost irresistible inclination 
to do wrong ; it seems hard that when a 
man drinks spirituous liquors his children 
and his children's children should find 
themselves urged by a burning thirst, 
which they can scarcely withstand, toward 
indulgence in intoxicating drinks ; it 
seems hard that diseases should be trans- 
mitted, and that because a man has vio- 
lated the laws of health, his children should 
be sickly and short-lived — these things 
seem hard so long as we look at them only 
on one side ; but what a power of restraint 
this economy has when every man feels, 
' I stand not for myself alone, but for the 
whole line of my posterity to the third 
and fourth generation V " 

And of life here and hereafter : "Hardly 
anything that could be desired in this 
life has been withheld from me ; I have 
had that which many covet and seek for 
in vain ; my life all through has been a 
very happy one ; it may be said, without 
exception, taking it from beginning to 



i 



110 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



end, to have been a life of extraordinary 
prosperity and happiness, although I 
have been a man of war. But there is 
nothing in this world, it seems to me, 
that is to be desired for one single mo- 
ment in comparison with the life beyond. 
If that life is all that we have been taught 
it is— and I believe it to be that and 
abundantly more — then let no man wish 
to stay here. It is true that the going of 
one and another leaves a wound in the 
heart of those that are left behind ; but it 
is true, also, that God heals such wounds 
speedily." 



Color Blindness. 

The investigation of color blindness in 
various countries has shown that in all 
civilized countries there are to be found 
on an average four color blind persons 
in every one hundred men, but only one 
who is color blind among five hundred 
women. It thus appears that color blind- 
ness is twenty times as frequent among 
men as among women. No reason has 
been assigned for this, except the use of 
tobacco. Tobacco using has been recog- 
nized as a common cause of eye defects of 
various kinds, among the most frequent 
of which is color blindness. Color blind- 
ness is, in fact, the first symptom of to- 
bacco amaurosis. Color blindness is 
found to exist among the North American 
Indians in the proportion of less than 
one per cent. The use of tobacco must 
be condemned, on every ground of healthy 
living, as a source of race-deterioration. — 
Health. 



George Eliot. 

An English woman writer says it is to 
be feared that posterity will never know 
exactly what was the living aspect of 
George Eliot's face. Only a very great 
painter could have seized at once the out- 
line and something of the varying expres- 
sion ; and her reluctance to have her por- 
trait taken, her private person made to a 
certain extent public property in that 
way, has deprived us of any such me- 
morial. Future generations will have to 
draw on their imagination to conceive a 
face cast in the massive mold of Savona- 
rola, but spare and spiritualized into a 
closer brotherhood with the other Floren- 
tine of the Divina Commedia. The fea- 
tures might be too large and rugged for 



womanly beauty ; but when the pale fW 
was tinged with a faint flush of tender 
ness or animation, when the wonderful 
eyes were lighted up with eager passion 
and the mouth melted into curves of m 
utterable sweetness, the soul itself seemed 
to shine through its framework with a 
radiance of almost unearthly power so 
that a stranger seeing her for the first time 
asked why he had never been told she was 
so beautiful. 



In the Exchange Realm. 

All exchanges receiving a copy of the 
College Forum will please consider this 
a most cordial invitation to exchange. 

11 Our Dumb Animals," with its many 
interesting features, has the honor of be- 
ing the first exchange to appear since va- 
cation. We wish it much success in its 
noble efforts to better the condition oftha 
brute family. 

The last school year was closed by 
many of our exchanges with magnificent 
commencement numbers, all of which 
gave evidence of much editorial labor 
and skill. Although it was a difficult 
task to rate their excellence, yet we think 
the Nemosynean takes the lead, both in 
design and material. We congratulate 
all these papers upon their enterprising 
management. 

A noticeable fact of some of our ex- 
changes is their publication of continued 
stories. This is certainly commendable, 
since it creates among the students a 
strong interest in their school journal. 

As this is our first issue for the school 
year of 1894-'5. we wish to extend a kind 
greeting and a warm re-welcome to all our 
old exchanges. We also hope to receive 
many new ones during the year. 

We trust that all may be prompt and 
regular in exchanging their journals, and 
we will make an earnest effort to do like- 
wise. With a determination to meet our 
obligations as well as possible, we again 
bid you welcome. 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

OPPO. COOK COUNTY HOSPITAL, CHICAGO, ILL. 

,JP e ^i n $ e J Term be S' ns September 1894, and ends Apr"; 
1895. Total fees $105 each Winter Term, and a laboratory 
deposit which is returnable. Four annual graded cour?». 
with advanced standing for graduates in Pharmacy andtni 
versity preparatory courses prior to the study ot Medici" 6 
Clinical and laboratory facilities unsurpassed, 
-tor annual circular of information, apply to 

W. E. QUINE, M. D., 

Pres. of the Faculty, 
813 WEST HARRISON S ■ 



4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Ill 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 

TIMETAB LE — Oct. 1, 1P93. 

CM>g 
Acc. 



Down Tbains. 



No.12 



Lv Winchester 

» Jlartinsburg . ... 

• Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

« Cbambersburg .. 

« Shippensburg 

» Newville 

» Carlisle 

« Mechauicsburg.. 
Ar. Dillsburg 

» Harrisburg 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 
A. M. 



Ky'e 
Exp 



No. 2 



No. 4 No. 6 



A. M. 

6 15 

7 00 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
8 40 

10 04 



10 25 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 

P. M. 



Mr'g 
Mail 



Day 
Exp 



9 05 
"956 
1080 



1 25 
4 03 
3 10 
P. M. 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
1 40 



2 00 

6 50 
9 38 
6 45 
P. M. 



Kv'g 
Mail 



No. 8 



P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 

4 10 

4 36 

5 00 
5 30 

5 51 

6 17 
6 43 



7 05 

11 15 
3 50 
10 40 
P. M. 



No. 10 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Lv. Baltimore 

New York .. .. 
Philadelphia.. 



Harrisburg 

Dillsburg 

Mechanicsburg . 

Carlisle 

Newville 

Shippensburg.... 
Chambersburg.. 

Greencastle 

Hagerstown 

Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp- 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


11 40 


4 45 


8 53 


11 20 


2 15 


4 23 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 50 


2 20 


4 30 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


3 40 


520 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


1 03 


4 01 


5 41 


8 20 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


4 25 


6 05 


8 44 


5 55 


9 00 


1 52 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


5 10 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


535 


720 


9 50 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


550 




10 12 


7 25 


10 27 


3 25 


6 18 




10 35 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 






11 00 


12 00 




7 50 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



«t in»- naiuo wu leave xiarnsDurg aaii v except tsnnclay 
ainwoa. m.. )0:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
troln •!?•,' st °PP' n S at all intermediate stations ; additional 
iram will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 

pSm st °PP ,n S at all i termediate stations. 
Yn,.b T al ir a,ace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
Mpm n h?.£ eystone Ex P ress and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express w. st. 
ExnriSw epil V; Cars on Ni 8 ht Express and New Orleans 
2H5«i!«ween^hiiadelphia and N w Orleans. 

I F wriVti 8 i'4^ al i> ve r lse "anything anywhere at~any 
New Y 0r k? P ' ROWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce S 

E V vertk?,?^ !", ne( ; a 1f information on the subject of ad- 
Advertk^i^ VX l do wel1 to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Md, on reppint t |l; .'« es v pnce one dollar- Mailed, postage 
the An PH,.n,P x 0f prlce - Contains a careful compilation from 
mSE" Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
ana a gSot 2 I '', g , lves th . e circulation rating of every one, 
JwtSnini ?S«, of » nf ormation about, rates and other matters 
EI ^'S Sm J ]? r T? u A ,ness of advertising. Address ltOW- 
York "^EKTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street. New 



. time, 
Street, 



Rensselaer \ 
^Polytechnic^ 
Institute, 



■^--^^SSiH^nsnrovidedfor. Send for 



Troy, N.Y. 



a Catalogue. 



David brandt, 
B °0T • AND • SHOEMAKER, 

A.NXVII.IJE, PENNA. 
^STUDENTS' WORK A SPECIALTY.-©* 



W. F. BECKER. 



J. P. BRUG6ER 



THE 



Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

Special Rates to Students. 

W Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE F OK PRICES. 

EL A. LOSER, 

GROCERIES AND CONFECTIONERY, 

OYSTERS AND ICE CREAM, 

ANNVILLE, IP A. 



g B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA 

ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, PA. 

THE BEST G OOPS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 

T R. McCAULY, 
DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. A NEVILLE, PA. 

JOHN TRUMP, 

J BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 



No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 




CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 

prompt answer and an honest opinion, write to 
MUNN tfc CO., who have had nearly fifty years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formation concerning Patents and bow to ob» 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, bas by far the 
largest circulation of any scientific work in zhe 
world. 93 a year. Sample copies sent free. 

Building Edition, monthly, *•>.% a year. Single 
cot/.e.s, Hft cents. Every number contains Oea>> 
tk^ui plates, in joiore, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs and secure contracts. Address 

MUNN & CO., New Yoke. 301 Broad WAX 



112 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



'YyiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SUA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



J 



ACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



D 1 



\R> Y GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

— AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J". JS. SHORES, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTEE, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KKEIDEK. J.NO. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANWVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE , j os E ™ a m7lle r • s. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

3VL. H- SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
TERS AND CKEAM. ANNVILLE, PA. 

S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 

JS. 33. WAGNER, 

— ^-S- Headquarters for 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



II you want to Buy a Hat right, and a right Hat, or anything in 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

successors to RAITT &. Co., 
Eighth and Cumber/and Sts., Lebanon, Pa, 

KInports & Shenfc 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away Jfrom home, and have a la 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869, 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.00. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.91 

Contingent Assets 11(5,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.00 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN". 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, with 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death ot a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


92 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 01) 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 


28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 


29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 



ASSM'T 

1 30 
1 40 

1 5a 

1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 92 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, wue« 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, P a> 



Volume VII. 



Number 8, 



THE 



College Forum. 



OCTOBER, 1894. 



•f CONTENTS : -f • 



October Days, 113 

Carlyle'g Heroes arid Hero Worship,. . .113-115 

The True Solution, 115-118 

Compulsory Education, 118-120 

Athletics, 120 

Editorials, 121 

Jishop Hott's Visit to the College, 122 

*°° tba «, 122, 123 

Alumni Notes, 123 



College Directory, 124 

Philokosmian Literary Society 124 

Clionian Literary Society, 124, 125 

Kalozetean Literary Society, 125 

Personals, 125 

Chestnut Picnic. 126 

Exchange Jottings, 126 

Advertisements, ...126-128 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf- Worn 

School s College Text Books 



o 

<3 
W 
o 

pq Together with a Complete Assortment of 

Q 

5Z! 

►J 

w 

CO 



o 
t- 1 
o 

o 



STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades, g 



A Selected Stock of the 



S LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 
n 

H AND 

* DECORATIONS. 



w 
o 
o 

CO 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 

E. E. GROSH, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

COLLEGE AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

INCLUDING 
NORMAL DBPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. 43 s - New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

ISAAC WOLF, 
'S 



ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
828 CUMBERLAND STREET. 






Engravers and Stationers, 

1022 WALNUT STREET, 

Philadelphia, 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kind 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing yon will 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Prices. 

Stock always Ne w and Fresh. Assortment Large. 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy25& 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty 
We carry in stock the publications of the 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnal* 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in t» 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 

AGENTS WANTED to sell the best and m" 8 ' 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents f" r 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 



CEIDER & BROTHER 



PUBLISHERS OF 



Photograph MarriageCertiflcates 



Photograph Family Records, Etc, Etc., 

YORK, PA. 

Please Mention "The College Forum." 



THE COLLEGE EOKUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VII. No. 8. 



ANNVILLE, PA., OCTOBER, 1894. Whole No. 74. 



October Days. 



Each hill-side now is gaily decked, 
And too, each rugged vale is flecked 
With sunny bands of golden-rod 
That to each breeze make cheerful nod ; 
Their sombre shadows o'er the wold, 
Reflecting all their wealth of gold. 

The orchards too, toward heaven's gaze, 
A deep red blush of joy upraise, 
While branches bend and even break, 
And fruits begin to fear and quake, 
Lest they shall fall and sadly mar 
Their ripen' d glow with bruised scar. 

And in the field the maize turns gold ; 
The buskers' stories are retold ; 
The milk-weed silk, so ivory white, 
Doth burst its pod and seek the light ; 
While here and there a quail astir, 
Screams forth his trembling whirr, whirr, 
whirr. 

Within the woody cloister's pale, 
* or winter loves the winds bewail ; 
Ihe maples touched by golden hand, 
Are brightly now with crimson tanned ; 
And one by one the nuts drop down, 
Upon the rustling, leafy brown. 

And over all spreads autumn haze, 
iaat maketh good the country ways ; 
! n ® tul1 round moon receives a thrill, 
Y , | 0( >ks down on nights that chill ; 
^et all this glory's but the maze, 
UI silent, sweet October days. 

NOBMAN C. SCHLICHTER, '97. 



Kyle's Heroes and Hero- Worship. 

BY PROF. J. A. M 'DERM AD, A. M. 

im^ 8 s eer and prophet have played an 

of th rtant * 3art * n re ^g ious progress 
of 't y. 0rld > especially in the earlier ages 
due istor y and development. This is 

is ar h ? ° ne hand ' to the fact that man 
i n r j%ious being, and by the prompt- 

mun- ? is nature is led to seek for com- 

T Qe ^ atl0n with the invisible and divine. 

v ea i . ee Pest intuitions of his nature re- 

10 him the fact that his existence did 



not proceed primarily from the earth, and 
that it cannot reach its fullest develop- 
ment and destin}^ in the things of matter 
and sense. In the midst of all present 
realities and experiences there looms up 
the fact that there are also invisible real- 
ities, to which the visible bears only the 
relation of the shadow to the substance, 
or the sign to the reality. To know the 
unknown is one of the master passions of 
the human heart. This is true of it in all 
the lines of its investigation and discov- 
ery, and is especially true of it in the line 
of its religious activity and research. 
The mighty problems which concern the 
outworking of moral character, the fulfill- 
ment of moral obligation, the achieve- 
ment of material success, the elevation of 
human reason and experience here, and 
the acquisition of immortality and enjoy- 
ment hereafter, urge the mind of man ever 
onward to solve and unfold these prob- 
lems. The very futility of the human in- 
tellect in dealing with these questions 
upon its own resources, has compelled the 
earnest inquirer to seek for communica- 
tion with the divine. If they are to be 
solved at all, it must be not by discovery 
but by revelation. Man cannot project 
the light, by means of his own faculties, 
into the realities and issues that lie be- 
yond the scope of mortal view, or the 
range of finite vision ; therefore, if light 
is to come at all to the solution of these 
questions, it must come from above. 

Then, on the other hand, the influence 
of the prophet has arisen from the fact 
that mankind in general have a belief 
(likely a reflection from Bible facts), that 
the divine Being deigns to communicate 
His will to the world. The facts of divine 
providence, in either a true or a false form, 
have figured largely in the mythologies 
and beliefs of the ancient as well as the 
modern world. As a result of these views 
various systems of priests, prophets and 



114 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



oracles have grown up in the heathen 
world. This important fact of divine re- 
velation and providence, of course finds its 
full verification and fulfillment in the 
sacred truths and prophesies of the Bible. 
The revelation of the divine will and 
teachings, whether in its true essence as 
in sacred Scripture, or in its false and 
grotesque forms as in heathen oracles and 
prophecies, has always been regarded with 
especial consideration, and those who 
spoke them with peculiar favor and sacred- 
ness. Carlyle has observed and well de- 
lineated this fact in his second chapter on 
" Heroes and Hero-Worship." The pro- 
phet is a person entrusted with knowledge 
of the divine will, and having a commis- 
sion to reveal it to men, thus being, in a 
certain sense, a mediator between God 
and man. The test of heroism in the 
prophet, according to Carlyle, consists in 
the fact of the sincerity of his purpose. 
Mead says of him, in regard to this view, 
" Whenever he found an honest man and 
good faith he found a hero and was at 
home." Carlyle makes sincerity the para- 
mount distinction and gravitating centre, 
around which all other qualities of the 
hero arrange themselves, and from which 
they derive their special virtue and merit. 

This quality, however, is deficient as a 
criterion of truth, in the fact that it lacks 
demonstrative evidence for the truthful- 
ness of its conclusions ; a man may be 
sincere and yet be a fanatic. Sincerity 
gives no clue to truth ; neither does it give 
to a man any rational hypothesis on which 
to vindicate his claim for the acceptance 
of the principles which he sees fit to 
espouse. A man may be driven to follow 
an ignis fatuus as well as a lamp, if he 
merely follow the blind instincts and rude 
impulses of a wild and uncultured nature. 
Carlyle claims that by being sincere man 
is put in harmony with nature, and that 
nature, by her mysterious and quickening 
energies, inspires him with prophetic 
power, and that, by breathing its spirit, he 
will be guided into truth. He may indeed 
thus be guided into natural truth; he may 
indeed be imbued with an impassioned 
sentiment for discovery ; nature may in- 
fuse into him the ardor of the poet, the 
sculptor, the musician ; but nature is no 
mediator between God and man ; it can 
establish no law of ethics, reveal no prin- 
ciple of rectitude, and communicate no 
revelation of divine fellowship. It can 
establish no hope of divine favor, nor re- 



veal any truths of such exalted super, 
natural character as the seer and prophet 
need to know. It does reveal to man % 
being of God, His existence and somen' 
His attributes, and also our relations o| 
dependence and subordination to Him 
but can never admit man into the realm 
of divine truth or inspired knowledge. 
This is beyond its province. 

Carlyle cites Mohammed as a type of a 
hero-prophet inspired by nature, and 
would have us believe that sincerity k 
the fundamental cause of his prophetk 
career. He says, "A man must conform 
himself to nature's laws, be verily in com. 
munion with nature and the truth of 
things, or nature will answer him, no, not 
at all." What has nature to do with the 
formation of the seer? It may draw oui 
his mind in solemn awe, in gratitude, in 
reverence and devout meditation, and thus 
prepare the individual for the apprehen- 
sion of higher and diviner realms and 
phases of truth, but beyond this it is 
mute, its influence is at best only pre- 
paratory. The Arab worship was very 
much of the character of a superstitious 
reverence of nature. The august and su- 
blime mysticism with which they were 
surrounded on every hand had, to their 
wild untutored hearts, the effect of an ec- 
static, thrilling enthusiasm, which wrought 
upon their susceptible natures with the 
fervor of a supernatural enchantment and 
admiration. Everything they saw and 
heard had a profound symbolical meaning 
and language, and thus they fell | nt() 
a kind of an exalted and superstition* 
nature worship. This fact is made clearly 
evident by the nrysterious reverence i» 
which they held the Caabah, the stone 
which fell from the sky, a meteoric stone- 
These devout sons of the desert com- 
muned with the devout and awful in Da ' 
ture as the visible representation of 3 
higher Power. 

That Mahommed, with his wild, fer^ 
impassioned nature, surrounded with cir- 
cumstances like these, should have ^ 
come imbued with an ardent religio llS fl f 
thusiasm, is not to be wondered at. ■r 
was no doubt a youth of sincere, dev° 
and truthful disposition ; we gi ye 
credit for that much ; we must P, 
him credit for that much of virtue^ 
least. He was concerned about the g 1 ^ 
questions of destiny and futurity! 
tried to look beneath eidola ; he trie* 
solve the great questions, and answer 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



115 



profound inquiries, which thrust them- 
selves upon his own mind, and the minds 
of bis countrymen concerning the exist- 
ence and attributes of that Being who, 
they believed, was "before all things, and 
by whom all things consist." Carlyle 
has rightly told us that no creed or doc- 
trine can long obtain credence with man 
if it does not have some truth in its 
foundation, something which appeals to 
the dictates and demands of his inner na- 
ture, and elicits from him a responsive 
interest. We believe, however, that the 
explanation of Mohommet's religious and 
prophetical career is this which follows. 
It is known that when a youth of fourteen, 
he came in contact with Sergius, the Nes- 
torian monk, whom he and his uncle 
Abu Thaleb are said to have lodged with, 
on one of their expeditions to Sj'ria. 
No doubt that he then and there heard of 
some of the truths of Christianity; no 
doubt he became impressed with the force 
of its doctrines, and obtained glimpses of 
its harmony and beauty and power. 

Still as a system it was all enigmatical 
and obscure to his youthful mind. How- 
ever, here was the seed thought which, 
though it lay dormant in his heart for a 
long time for lack of culture, still could 
not be and was not crushed. His im- 
passioned heart must have received some 
sincere convictions ; there must have been 
some truth at the bottom of that which 
he undertook. It could not have been 
altogether a fabrication and a device. 
Carlyle with pertinent truthfulness says, 

Our current hypothesis is about Mo- 
hammed, that he was a scheming impostor 
a fal sehood incarnate, that his religion is 
a myth, a mere mass of quackery and 
tatmty, begins now to be untenable to 
anyone." His profound religious and 

elective nature, when it became imbued 
JWh the force and potency of the frag- 
ments of the truth, which he had learned, 

enclered him in the course of time its im- 
passioned advocate and apostle. In fact, 
® £ onvi ctions of what he acquired in 
him became afterwards irresistible to 
min i Y £ aine(i ful1 possession of his 
his i'f anc * exercis ed supreme control over 
Posit ^ ne y became to him the most 
s houn \° f realites > as indeed they are and 
iloh t0 ever y one - From this point 
t e ii i" 1111 ^' 8 career begins, and who can 
divj ut tQ at there was something of 
douhti providen ce in it after all? for it was 
Ull ess better for the Arabs to have 



had his system than the one that they 
had had before. We believe, however, 
that the fundamental error in Mohammed's 
history is this, that he began and pursued 
his prophetical career under the influence 
of an overmastering passion, instead of a 
consistent and conformable principle. 
Having discovered some germs of real 
truth, he imagined himself in harmony 
with the whole system, and commissioned 
to propagate it ; his impulsive, wild, Arab 
nature became infatuated with this 
thought until escape from it was impossi- 
ble, and thus his career was determined, 
and his course of conduct established. 
So far as his allegiance and devotion to 
his purpose is concerned, he deserves to 
rank as a hero ; but, if we consider the 
truthfulness and efficiency of what he did 
and taught, his system presents that 
strange admixture of truth and fanati- 
cism, which usually constitutes the worst 
form of error. 



The True Solution. 



BY PROF. CYRUS FRANK FLOOK. 

All men are affected either for good or 
for evil, to a greater or less degree, by 
facts and circumstances external to them- 
selves. Every individual, however much 
he may recognize the helpfulness of influ- 
ences both within and foreign to him, 
finds himself beset with hostile environ- 
ments. With propriety we may include 
all form of being, from the smallest ani- 
malcule in a drop of water to the crown- 
ing work of God — the creature man. In 
the struggle for existence the weaker per- 
ish, 'tis only the stronger survive, and 
ultimately all succumb to a cruel and 
unrelenting hostility. 

As respects mankind, the principle 
applies to all human relations. The 
man who toils for his daily bread, the 
zealot who aspires for fame, the hunts- 
man who pursues in the chase, the pilot 
who plies his oar on a billowy sea, are all 
obvious examples of this principle and 
serve to index that diversified and almost 
endless record of human relations in 
which a conflict with hostile environments 
is visible. 

In all the affairs of men, whether in 
public or private life, harsh antagonisms 
about them affect them one way or the 
other. The believer either asserts him- 
self over against the evil, and in spite of 



116 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



it becomes an exemplar of truth or he 
suffers himself to be allured with friendly 
alliance with it and then becomes its ready 
servant and devotee. 

It is not a mere happening that man 
must combat evil. To effect the highest 
and truest culture of the human soul, the 
Almighty designed this plan. Herein lies 
the only true test of character. That 
man may rise from a mere creature of 
necessity and make virtue his own he 
must combat evil. Man could not be 
free if he could choose only the good. 
Such limitation would be fatality. The 
power to choose opposites implies the ex- 
istence of those opposites. For the pur- 
pose of the present we shall consider the 
position of man as he has to do with 
human conduct. 

Conduct is not intrinsically good be- 
cause there is in it the absence of positive 
evil, nor is your conduct meritorious be- 
cause you abstain from wrong doing, but 
is two fold — abstaining from wrong doing 
on the one hand, and doing good on the 
other, accomplishing both by deliberate 
choice. 

In our criticisms of man's conduct we 
want to be charitable. You may be 
better than your neighbor, but not intrin- 
sically better, because you are not subject 
to evil influences as he. We should not 
denounce because it is popular to do so, 
denounce for what you yourself might 
have done under the same circumstances. 
But we recognize also that there is such a 
thing as virtue possible to man, and we 
all have some of it, some a great deal 
more than others I hope, according to 
human standard at least. Look at the ef- 
fect as wrought out in practical life. 

Too often the good we possess, instead of 
acting as a lever to eliminate the bad, itself 
succumbs to the craftiness and pervers- 
ity of the enemy, and becomes the ready 
prey. The evil possesses the rare vantage 
ground of being the most popular, and its 
initial step is to beget moral stupor, and 
then to cajole its antagonist into amicable 
relations with it. Thus frequently the 
possessors of truth are often inveigled 
into friendly relations with the perpetra- 
tors and exponents of evil. Because of 
this, nations have fallen ; because of this, 
the American nation is rapidly pursuing 
the path that leads to destruction. The 
Hebrew nation, while providentially re- 
stored again and again and again, she sur- 
renders herself to the evil devices and 



cunning of the enemy and becomes their 
prey. This is not an exception, is true 
in all ages to a great extent, even with 
the serious moralist of to-day. Not to 
speak of the matter in detail (for who is 
not bound and fettered by unholy ambi- 
tion and sinful craving, by ready and will, 
ing submission to that preponderating 
evil hanging like a dark embargo upon 
the soul — diversified passion), but, to be 
more general, a conspicuous example of 
this in our day is the civilized nations of , 
the world either secretly entering into 
complicity with the perpetrators of high | 
crime or proposing terms of compromise. 
In France and Germany it is national sanc- 
tion of impurity and social vice. In India, 
Africa and our own country the rum in- 
terest is quite extensive. Old Bacchus is 
thus supreme among his majestic subjects, 
by appealing to their love for gain- 
shameful and disreputable complicity 
with the most heartless and relentless foe 
of the home and the church. The rum 
god is everywhere dominant. He is the 
insolvent dictator in our law-making 
bodies, the shrewd caviler in our civil 
courts, the thief and embezzler of our 
public moneys, the defiant disturber of 
the public peace, the cruel offender and 
destroyer of the home, the silent intruder 
in our churches. Bomanism in secret 
conclave is conspiring against the most 
powerful lever of our civilization— the 
public school system. 

Is there a solution to the problems of 
Nihilism in Bussia, Socialism in Germany. 
Communism in France, Anarchism in 
America — the rudest of all isms? Ism' 8 
a half schism, whether it be national or 
ecclesiastical. Is there a solution to the 
financial problem of to-day ? 

Why all this? Because of the various 
governments forgetting the laws of Godi 
not recognizing He who is the founder of 
all good governments. The Constitution 
of this Nation is not Christian. The 
word Deity never appears, nor is th er f 
any religious test required for the elig 1 ' 
bility to office. 

If you are riding on the train at sisj) 
miles an hour are you not anxious 
know the knowledge the man has who 5* 
his hand on the throttle? The steaflj 
plowing through the ocean billows ^ 
two thousand passengers on board-— wl \ s 
of that engineer, unless he understan 
the use of the valves, crank-pins, g aU ^ e 
and governors ? If a competent m an 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



will know this, will be found at his post 
of duty, he will see that all the machin- 
ery is kept oiled, the friction lessened and 
wear taken up. What if he don't ? The 
ship will never reach the shore. He will 
not be able to steer through the dense fog 
and storms that beat the waves mountain 
high. Ah, sir, this old " Ship of State " 
is sailing with sixty-five million passen- 
gers on board. What about the helms- 
man and his attendants ? It appears they 
are neither able to breast the storm nor 
able to anchor. 

* * * * * 

WHAT WE NEED. 

1. We need trained men, men who are 
statesmen. Few of us ever think of our 
duty to the Government until a few 
weeks previous to election — opening of 
the campaign, as they say. The spirit of 
statesmanship must be always going on. 
It may be quickened by campaign fever, 
but the work of preparation should begin 
with the child and end only when death 
ends it. Great things are not accom- 
plished in a week or year. Millet toiled 
twenty years in painting a cloud, though 
be died in poveity, but he caught the 
glory of the skies and gave it unto men, 
and his name has become almost divine 
for that delicacy of touch, " those elusive 
tints of the upper air." Michael Angelo, 
in his ninetieth year, with keen eye and 
nerve steady, high in the work of art, 
made the ceilings of the Capitoline as 
tbey were to be. 

2- We should have those in public 
places whose minds are packed with rea- 
soning as clear and rhetoric brilliant and 
enthusiastic as any that have yet graced 
™e pages of history. We as a Church 
should demand this class of men for posi- 
tions f trust and responsibility. But if 

I h- h takes the lead y° u sav she is 

setting into politics, and this she must 
do; her ministers must have nothing 
J wi th politics. Whv not? I am 
gpn C a minister is a good specimen of the 
lele J 0W0 > a nd should have that privi- 
cuf them go to the primaries, cau- 
are es ' see to it that instead of men who 
not t k P°iiticians and demagogues are 
dorse° ° Ur ^w-making power, but en- 
l 0Ve t ^ n ? n w ho are statesmen, men who 
Purse f eUow-man more than their 
m an j ' 1 ? en . with energy, broad views, 
Put I , elin g s , wisdom and foresight. 

*ent i en at the head of this Govern- 
and our country will be restored, 



invigorated, advanced — " corruption will 

disappear in the splendor of public virtue." 

****** 

Many of our present legislators are as 
indifferent and as brutish as the South 
Sea Islanders or as the free-footed 
Bedouins of the desert. Think of it, 
millions of dollars locked up in our nat- 
ional banks, while thousands of men, 
women and children are standing at the 
very gates of starvation. One hundred 
men own one hundred million dollars, 
while the combined wealth of ten thousand 
is not sufficient to buy a loaf of bread. 
Twenty-five thousand men own one-half 
of our wealth. Seventy thousand men 
own two-thirds of our wealth. This is 
the question of the hour. Money is the 
abominable poison that has circulated in 
the body politic and corrupted this entire 
Nation. It has caused men to say " yes " 
to oppression and "no" to equal right, when 
they should have said u yes "when right 
and " no " to oppression, and said it in 
such tones that e'er this time the glad 
news might have been heralded from the 
Lakes to the Gulf, from shore to shore, 
that the two great oceans might have 
joined in to chant the grand accompani- 
ment, from the Rockies to the Alleghanies, 
and from thence to the shore until every 
home that decks the hillside would have 
caught up the refrain. The hand of indi- 
vidual wealth must be closed. Destroy 
its political power and it will be closed. 
If you do not, it will be like the sick man, 
with a room full of quarrelling doctors, 
the man dies and the doctors get what is 
left. 

We are morally sick — we have the La 
Grippe — our statesmen at Washington, D. 
C, have made a criminal blunder in the 
diagnosis of the case by declaring it 
political grip and drenching it with doses 
of tariff. One party says give the dose 
all at once, while the other party would 
diminish the dose, but increase it fre- 
quently. 

****** 
One of the strongest symptoms showing 
us that the Nation is sick is the lack of 
patriotism. We must keep up the spirit 
of patriotism. The stars and stripes mean 
a great deal, but their meaning is almost 
unknown to many of our leaders. Persons 
of high position go fishing on Decoration 
Day and send substitutes in time of war; 
men who were members of " Knights of 
the Golden Circle," known to all as a 



118 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



treasonable organization, men who were 
wounded fighting against their country, 
men who eulogize the murder of Lincoln, 
men who drag down the stars and stripes 
as was done at Honolulu, such are some 
of those who are high up in official life. 
Not only have stocks and bonds fallen 
below par, but patriotism as well. Men in 
the Senate that hooted at the American 
flag and trampeled on it ! Let us place the 
seal of condemnation on their forehead. 
Our flag is at half mast; shall it be run up 
or shall it be run down. That starry 
banner that was carried to battle at Buil 
Run and to victory at Appomattox yet 
should be officered over by God-fearing 
men, men who love righteousness rather 
than treachery. These are those that will 
venture where Angels fear to tread. We 
can have Herods to-day if we wish them, 
though I pray there be a Red Sea for 
every one of them. 

****** 

THE REMEDY. THE MEDICINE. THE SOLUTION. 

The election to Congress of men who 
are actuated by a desire to benefit their 
fellow-men and a disposition to relegate 
self-aggrandizement to the rear, men who 
will not talk tariff all week while their 
constituents are begging for bread ; men 
who are better acquainted with that vol- 
ume which contains the fundamental prin- 
ciples on which all good government is 
based, instead of being able to misquote 
a few isolated passages from it on the 
tariff or silver bill ; in brief, moral men, if 
not Christian men — men who know how 
to conquer in difficulty. 

The boys of '61, '62 and 63 feared noth- 
ing, neither cannon, shot or shell. They 
swore allegiance to the stars and stripes. 
Let us a nation, we as a Christian people, 
irrespective of creed or political prejudice, 
stand firm to that flag that floats from 
Calvary's brow ; let our leaders be men 
who will stand by this flag, will lift it up, 
carry it to the front ranks, yea, in the 
very heat of the battle, plant it on the 
very battlements of right, stand by it 
and with the sword of the spirit break 
down the parapets of sin. Such men we 
need, such men in Congress will solve the 
problem. 



If a young man ever needs to realize the 
presence of God, it is when, like Jacob, he 
leaves the home of his father and turns 
his face towards the city of strangers. 



Compulsory Education. 



BY J. H. RE HE It, M. E. 

Compulsory education is regarded by 
some as an intrusion upon the rights of a 
free people. The American people enjoy 
the blessings of a system of free educa- 
tion and adequate means for duly main- 
taining the same. But next to the pro- 
vision of means, the first and paramount 
effort must be to give it universal effect 
by bringing it within reach of the greatest 
number of youth not otherwise provided 
for. The supreme importance of educa- 
tion certainly bears out the proposition 
that the freer the people of a nation, the 
more stringent and universal should be 
the regulations affecting their education, 
If a nation do not choose that they or 
their posterity shall some day pass under 
the yoke of despotism, all their people 
must be educated, not by the cultivation 
of their intellectual faculties merely, but 
in a constant practical exercise of the 
moral principle, in the power of conscious- 
ness, in the familiar habit of doing right 
from good motives and for right ends, 
without which the mere ability of think- 
ing right is worse than mere pretense. 
Free education without an enforcement 
of its demands will have but a transitory 
existence. 

Since the digest of a free country is 
full of legal means to suppress those 
physical nuisances which destroy the 
health and happiness of its people, should 
not greater precautions be used to abate, 
or rather to prevent the moral malaria 
which from the first dawn of our system 
of free schools has continued to destroy 
and deprave its design of raising the peo- 
ple to a plane where they could enjoy frf 
citizenship? There should be a power tf 
every free country for the protection ' 
its educational system against corrupts 
and decay. 

The safety of a nation consists in such 
a law as compels its patrons to attain the 
highest possible degree of intellig en ^ 
and God speed the day when the imp° r 
ance of such a law is realized. 

The time has come that the people 
themselves for the support of thousan 
of teachers and for erecting schoolhous^ 
for every three or four square miles oft 
State, and fitting them up with libra" 
and all the means of instructing, e ^ eV ?^L 
and refining our people. Why should 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



119 



be done, if it is to be a matter of indiffer- 
ence whether our people may turn their 
backs upon them and grow up in igno- 
rance and vice? 

The State can not and should not 
liffhtly usurp the parents' authority or 
interfere with their children's welfare 
without cause ; yet it is the duty of the 
State and within the purest view of free- 
dom to see that every child is educated 
somewhere and to a certain degree ; other- 
wise those who are in fault cannot right- 
fully complain if treated as offenders 
against their children and the public hap- 
piness. 

In the Republic of Switzerland, as well 
as throughout Germany, it is obligatory 
on the part of every parent, no matter 
what his condition in life, to provide for 
the education of his children, either by 
educating them in an efficient manner at 
home or by sending them to some school. 
He possesses the entire and uncontrolled 
liberty in making his own choice of the 
mode, but educated they must be. The 
goverment permits no child to grow up to 
manhood or womanhood without a care- 
ful physical, intellectual, moral and relig- 
ious training. In many German States 
the education of the child must continue 
until the age of fourteen, and in some of 
them until the sixteenth year. Yet it is 
said that in Prussia all the young chil- 
dren between the ages of six and fourteen 
Me in regular attendance at school; all 
the teachers are of the highest type ; all 
the pupils are taught the great truths and 
doctrines of religion ; they can read, write 
a nd sing, understand the principles of 
arithmetic, know the history of their own 
country and the geography of the world. 

the public school system of our coun- 
try is a grand system, but we must admit 
jt to be far short of any such efficiency in 
the extent or universality of its influence. 

by making the education of their 
^udren compulsory on the part of the 
Parents can the purpose of the system be 
h h realized. 

f 0u ^?f 0rtun g to our census about one- 

incr °^ ^ ne y° un g °f our k 111 ^ are g row - 
iti? Up „ amon g us without the first requis- 
th? i an educat ion for the discharge of 

of lh • 68 in after life or the en J°y ment 

cle J^hts and privileges of a free peo- 
l ec l and without the least moral and intel- 
ual fitness to become citizens. 



Whether 



the 



intellectual advantages have 



means of lessening vice and 



crime or not, you need to be referred 
only to the records of the past. 

The intelligent embrace freedom be- 
cause they love it and enjoy its benefits, 
while the ignorant disregard it and are 
suppressed only by lawful authority. It 
is an old maxim, " Spai*e the rod and 
spoil the child," but it may be as truth- 
fully said, Neglect the education of the 
children and spoil the nation. 

The necessity of a compulsory school 
law is shown by the irregularity in at- 
tendance. This shows its evil effects in 
the drawback to the discipline and work- 
ings of the school. It is preferable to 
secure the cooperation of parents in cor- 
recting the habit, but on account of the 
laxity of the parent in this regard it is 
necessary to resort to other means to al- 
leviate the hindrance. 

A large part of the pupils in ordinary 
attendance in the public schools and sup- 
posed to enjoy their beneficial influences 
are, by their irregular habits, not only 
slighting their own privileges, but are in- 
flicting serious injuries upon those who 
are constant and punctual, thus doing 
injuries to others as well as to themselves. 

In scores of homes the parents are al- 
ways ready to give excuses for absences. 
Due allowance should be made where 
children are unavoidably detained at 
home, but absences do not always occur 
from such reasons ; snch excuses do not 
come so much from the poor, where it 
might be expected, as from those who do 
not trouble themselves to know of them 
or do not care. In families whose cir- 
cumstances would best entitle them to 
sympathy and help in this respect are 
seen so many instances of sacrifice on the 
part of fathers and mothers, who take 
upon themselves all inconveniences and 
hardships rather than once withdraw or 
even delay their children for a few min- 
utes from being punctual at school, that 
it is hard to conceal the fact that the 
tardy and irregular pupils in the schools 
are oftentimes made so by the indolence 
or thoughtless indulgence, or sometimes 
by the mere selfishness of parents. The 
parent can sustain no greater loss himself 
or inflict a greater on his children than 
by marring the golden hours of educa- 
tion, which the public schools now in 
operation open to the children of the 
land. 

There have been instances in the ex- 
perience of every school to show how, by 



120 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the steadfast, persevering care of watch- 
ful parents, who, in spite of every obsta- 
cle or temptation, maintained their sons 
and daughters year after year, first 
through the district school and then 
through the high school, the poorest and 
humblest homes have been lighted up and 
made rich and happy by the power of 
intelligence and worth there derived. 

Wonderful are the instances of this 
kind which happen yearly, and in view of 
this, education assumes a priceless value, 
such that he who looks upon them may 
well feel that he would forfeit days and 
nights of toil to gain for his offspring 
such advancement in life. Our edu- 
cational system to-day furnishes such 
advantages to every one at no cost. 

Could persuasions reach those thou- 
sands of parents whose children make up 
the large list of the careless and indiffer- 
ent pupils in our schools, they would cor- 
rect the injury which they are doing 
themselves and their children and make 
it their daily care to have their children 
attend school regularly and punctually. 
Such means have been tried since the in- 
troduction of the present system of edu- 
cation, and the result is a greater irregu- 
larity in attendance and more indifference 
on the part of a large mass of the peo- 
ple ; so from the results of the past 
and from the occurrences of the pres- 
ent, it becomes evident that the only 
way to wipe out vice and crime is 
to raise our young men and women to 
a higher moral, intellectual and religious 
plane, which can be accomplished only by 
a system of compulsory education. 



Athletics. 



The Corona Tennis Club has been en- 
joying a measurably successful season. 
The courts having been placed in almost 
perfect condition, the plajang averages 
have been in consequence considerably in- 
creased. A greater degree of enthusiasm 
should characterize the members of the 
club in order to raise this sport to its 
highest standard. 

While our athletic spirit at L. V. C. is 
constantly growing stronger, it has not 
been such as to enable the placing of a 
strong football team in the field this sea- 
son. Although we sadly lament this fact, 
our baseball club has in a measure satis- 
fied this deficiency. In its fall contests it 
has exhibited such ability as foreshadows 



the winning of much glor}' during th 
Spring season. 

On Saturday, September 22, the strong 
Lebanon team crossed bats with Us 
The game was a magnificent one in every 
respect.. The gilt-edge work of Runkle 
both at bat and in the field, was a proni 
nent feature. Chas. Sleichter, the new 
pitcher, also did remarkable work, only 
three hits being made off his delivery. 
The game resulted in favor of L. V. C. by 
the following score : 



L. V. C. R. H. PO. A. E. 

Waltz, lb.,... l 18 

Speraw, c.,..l 11 

Runkle, ss.,..l 2 3 2 1 

Henry, if.,... 

Sanders, 3b.,.0 10 

Parker, of.,.. 2 

Arndt. 2b.,...0 10 4 

Brewer, rf.,..0 

Sleichter, p.. 111 



Total 3 4 26 7 2 



LEBANON. R. H. PO. A E 

Hedrich,lb.,.0 9 o » 

Boltz, 1., 0()3( 

Adams, c.„. .0 7 o o 

Clements.2b,0 5 2 1 

Light, p.-3b*0 111 

Wolf, cf.,....l 2 1 

Light, G. ss.,0 Olio 

Honafus, lf.,.0 1 1 

Light,R., rf.,.0 1 



Total, ... 1 4 24 7 4 

12 3 456789 

L - V. C, 3 1=3 

.Lebanon, o 1 0=1 

*Hit by batted ball. Struck out by Sleichter, 7: 
Boltz, 7. Base on balls, Sleichter, 1 ; Boltz, 3 Passed 
balls, Speraw, 2 ; Adams, 2. Two base hit, Wolf, 
Double play, Clements to Hedrick. Time, 1 hours 
minutes. Umpire, R. Kreider. 

On Saturday, September 29, another 
game was played with Lebanon. Errors 
were the chief features of the game, 
although there were some brilliant plays 
that elicited applause from the " rooters.'' 
But since victory cometh not without 
defeat, Lebanon " turned the tables " and 
won easily by the score of ten to seven. 
We regret that we were unable to get the 
full score. 

The most hopeful feature in athletics 
at L. V. C. is the recent organization of 
an Athletic Association, which has been 
forced upon the students by necessity, 
coupled with good judgment. The first 
meeting was held on Friday, September 
28, in the College chapel. A goodly num- 
ber of students were present and much 
enthusiasm prevailed. The following on- 
cers were elected : President, Charles H- 
Sleichter; Vice President, Ed. An- 
thony; Secretary, Ira E. Albert, and 
Treasurer, N. C. Schlichter. We trust 
the Association will become firmly estab- 
lished upon a good financial basis, and to 
do this each student must lend his utmosj 
enthusiasm and pecuniary interest. *' 
this be done the benefits of this associ* 
tion will soon be evidenced. The CoU^ 
Forum wishes it much success. 



Schoolhouses are the republican li lie 
fortifications. 



of 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



121 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



,.„„ w Maysilles, '95. Ira E. Albert, '97. 

JQUXn. VV ALTER G. Clipfinger, '99. 

EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

Norman C. Schlichter, '97. 



ALCMM EDITOR. 
Prof. John E. Lehman, A. M., '74. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Estella Stehman, '96. 
Philokosmian Society— W. Elmer Heilman. 
Kalozetean Society— Harry W. Mayer, '95. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-five cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



The first public rhetoricals for the col- 
legiate year will be given on November 3d 
and 10th. 



The lecture course opens on the even- 
ing of November 2d by the Swedish 
Ladies' Quartet. They appear in the 
picturesque costume of their native prov- 
ince, and will sing in English, Swedish, 
French and German. The program prom- 
ises a rich treat to all lovers of music. 



To he a student is a great and grand 
privilege. What the results will be to 
the individual depends, in a marked de- 
gree, upon the student himself. It should 
m ean nobler aspirations, the building of 
character, a fuller manhood and a higher 
Christian life. It is all one great princi- 
P le of acquisition and unfolding. "A 
student without God is a student gone 
Wrong » 



The action of the students of Prince- 
11 *n unanimously abolishing the dis- 
graceful custom of "hazing" has been 
^ an iy , and has received universal ap- 
al - Grave barbarities such as have 

cone" 601 recentIy at some of the leadin S 
& es of this country should receive 



the just condemnation they merit. Jus- 
tice should be meted out without respect 
to persons. That young men, and even 
ladies, while attending institutions of 
learning, can do what under other circum- 
stances would not only be condemned and 
punished, but would be regarded as gross 
wrongs against society, is an erroneous 
and dangerous idea that should be set 
right by the strong arm of the civil law. 
There should be no privileged classes. 
Decency and respect for the rights of 
others should be a part of the curriculum 
of study. 

The Fall Conferences, cooperating with 
the College, namely the East German and 
the East Penns3 T lvania, held their annual 
sessions during the present month and 
both were well attended, presided over by 
Bishop Hott with great acceptance, and 
the deliberations were of a highly in- 
teresting character. Educational meet- 
ings were held by both bodies and ad- 
dressed by President Bierman ; D. R. 
Miller, of Dayton, Ohio; Rev. M. J. 
Mumma and others. Resolutions of con- 
fidence and support were passed by unani- 
mous vote. Rev. Charles A. Mutch and 
Isaac B. Haak, Esq., were reelected trus- 
tees for the East German Conference, 
and Rev. Samuel D. Faust, D. D., and 
Adam R. Forney, A. M., for the East 
Pennsylvania Conference. A resolution 
was also passed naming the last Sunday 
in April as " College Day," instead of the 
first Sunday in May, to prevent interfer- 
ence hereafter with the Y. P. C. U. anni- 
versary, and also to bring the day nearer 
the date (April 26) of the founding of our 
first institution of learning. 



The week of prayer for young men and 
women of our colleges will begin Novem- 
ber 11th. These meetings have always 
been productive of much good at L. Y. 
C. It is hoped that the Church will 
remember this week of special religious 
work. 



4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Bishop Hott's Visit to the College. 

On Monda}', after the adjournment of 
the East German Conference, Rev. J. W. 
Hott, the presiding bishop, took occasion 
to visit the College. 

By request of the President, he con- 
ducted the chapel exercises ; after which 
he gave the students a very profitable 
talk of over half an hour, in which he en- 
tertained them with words of advice, wis- 
dom, wit and humor. 

He stated that he had recently visited 
all tne institutions of the church but one. 

In the beginning of his remarks he 
said, " It's a grand thing to be a young 
man or a young woman," and that he 
would rather be a college student than a 
bishop. 

Almost invariably young men and 
young women decide their professional, 
social and religious relations for after-life 
before they reach the age of twenty-two. 

They will, as a rule, before this time, 
have chosen their profesion or calling. 
In social life the young man will have 
presented his plea to some fair one of the 
opposite sex and will have received a reply 
in the form of a great big " yes " or — "that 
other thing." 

The young lady will have her social 
future determined at that very important 
time by either a big black cloud or a 
beam of sunshine confronting her. 

They will also have determined, forever, 
what relations they will sustain to God, 
as well as the character of their religious 
life. 

All this occurs before they leave college. 
Then how very important it is that they 
lay well the foundation while there. 

The student's development is like the 
process of bread-baking. If not enough 
time is given the bread in which to rise, 
and it is placed in the oven, it will be 
burned badly on top, will be dough in the 
bottom, and there will be a great amount 
of sadness between. 

So it is with the student who devotes 
too little time in college. He goes out 
into the world without having the neces- 
sary preparation. The result is that his 
early life will be nothing but dough, his 
after-life a hard burned crisp, with a great 
deal of sadness between — all on account 
of " his being placed in the oven too 
soon." 

" Young man ! young woman ! take 
time to rise." 



Out of the Christian colleges will come 
the future statesmen of our country. 

After denouncing, in emphatic terms 
the present system of politics, he said 
that Temperance Reform, Woman's 
Rights and other important issues would 
be given the proper consideration by the 
future statesmen who are now the students 
in the church colleges of the land. 

He fittingly closed his address by wist 
ing the students God's blessing in their 
work. 

President Bierman than proposed a 
rising vote of thanks, to which all heartily 
responded. 



Football. 

Says a writer : " The man who sees a 
game of football for the first time notes 
one, two or more striking things. The 
first impression he gets is that football 
isn't a pillow fight by any means. In 
some points it resembles a game of Copen- 
hagen in that the players often kiss the 
earth with such fervor that they root up 
the ground with their noses and front 
teeth. To a great extent it resembles the 
good old game of k Pussy wants a cor- 
ner,' because it is altogether different. 
The players are not fair to look upon, and 
it is not on record that any girl ever 
eloped with a football player — right after 
the game. Each and every player has* 
head on him that on account of its abund- 
ance of hirsute adornment makes him 
look like an exaggerated and animated 
chrysanthemum. This door mat on top 
of his cranium is necessary to prevent 
concussion of the brain. Some of them 
have miniature pillows tied over their 
ears, so that that highly useful organ 
looks like a dropsical doughnut. Others 
again have a contrivance over their nose 
that resembles an inverted chicken trough. 
A person so equipped looks about as dia- 
bolical as a person well can look. All the 
players have a section of paling fence tied 
around their shins. 

" These observations are the result ot 
witnessing the game. There are eleven 
fellows on a side, known as guards, cen- 
tres, half, full and quarter backs, aD , 
several other things. Just why 
backs are divided into so many sectio^ 
deponent sayeth not, because he know et 
not. Every player, as far as the wr J 
could see, had a full and cornp let 
back. The play is very funny. ^° 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



123 



sides line up facing each other, and 
on e of their number holds an ellipitical 
ball on the ground, while another fellow 
recites a section of the multiplication 
table. When he is through the ball is 
suddenly snapped back to another fellow, 
w ho tries to run with it into the other 
gang's territory. For some reason the 
other gang objects to that, and about half 
a dozen fellows precipitate themselves on 
the unfortunate martyr who has the ball 
and try to jam him half way to China. 
In an instant the air is filled with hair, 
arms, legs, adjectives, etc., which soon 
resolve themselves into a compact mass of 
writhing, weaving, struggling, grunting 
humanity. A long-legged individual, who 
hops around like a fly on a hot skillet, 
then yells something, and the heap of 
players which looks for all the world like 
a mass of worms in a bait box slowly dis- 
integrate, and some of them get up, while 
others keep on lying on the ground and 
look as if there wasn't enough air in the 
atmosphere for them." 



Alumni Notes. 



The editor of this department is ex- 
pected to inform the readers of the Forum 
from month to month where the alumni 
and alumnae are and what they are doing. 
The compensation is not sufficient to jus- 
tify our running around all over the United 
States to find all this out, nor have we 
hme to do so. Hence our information 
must come from other sources. Let the 
alumni and their friends inform the editor 
of their whereabouts. We would like to 
see them more closely in touch with their 
alma mater and so with one another. 

"18, Rev. H. B. Dohner has recently 
oeen appointed agent of Union Biblical 
Seminary. 

93, Rev. D. S. Eshelman gave us a call 
at) out October 1st while on his way to the 
seminary at Dayton, Ohio. He very ac- 
ceptably served the congregation of the 
I «jk First U. B. church the past year, 
j 85 > Rev. J. A. Lyter will preach at Mt. 
th°^r/ 0r com i n g year. This is the 
Aird year of his ministry there. He is 
r y popular among his people. 
hJ\ Rev - S. C. Enck was returned b} r 
q Conference to Manheim, Pa., and 
ville p afer Was a PP ointed to Mount- 
inar ' Both are graduates of the Sem- 
f eren ^ risin & voun g men in tne Con- 



'93, Miss Elvire Stehman, with her bro- 
ther, Master Warren Stehman, visited 
College on the 13th inst. 

'78, Rev. G. F. Bierman continues to 
preach the word to the people at Marietta, 
Pa. 

'74, H. E. Steinmetz, of Clay, Pa., was 
a delegate to the East Pennsylvania An- 
nual Conference and took an active part 
in all its proceedings. 

'93, Horace W. Crider was considerably 
injured in a football game at Harrisburg 
on Saturday the 13th inst. 

'94, Samuel F. Huber stopped with us 
while on his way to Philadelphia, where 
he entered the law department of the 
University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Huber 
sold nearly four hundred and fifty "Chau- 
tauqua " desks during the summer. L. V. 
C. ahead again. 

'89, Rev. A. A. Long is continued as 
pastor at Columbia, Pa., much to the sat- 
isfaction of his people. 

'87, Rev. A. T. Denlinger is to be the 
esteemed pastor of Penbrook for another 
year. 

'80, Miss Alice K. Gingrich, who 
teaches music at San Joaquin Yalley Col- 
lege, Cal., is an expert on the bicycle, as 
well as on the piano. We may hear that 
she is coming East soon on the " wheel." 



An article on " The Destinies of the 
American Republic " in the Delphic 
closes with these words : 

" America, bequeathed to thee are the 
choicest products of human endeavor, the 
treasures of sixty centuries. Thy duty is 
to guard and defend just and equal 
liberty, the truth of divine religion, and 
the majesty and sovereignty of the people 
— realizations of the poet's dream and the 
patriot's prayer. Blessed with unequalled 
capabilities and incomparable institutions, 
thy responsibility is great. Child of the 
Past, be true, and thy loyal sons will deck 
thy brow with gems" that shall shine ere 
long on God's own wonderful throne. 
Glorious is thy destiny, proud queen of 
the future. God speed thee.' , 



The work in the gymnasium this term 
is progressing finely. The classes in the 
various drills are large and enthusiastic, 
and under the careful management of 
Director H. W. Mayer are rapidly in- 
creasing their physical powers. 



124 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



College Directory. 
Faculty. 

E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 

JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 

ANNA M. THOMPSON, Ph., B., 
Professor of English Literature. 
OSCAR ELLIS GOOD, A. B., 
Adjunct Professor of Natural Science. 
CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 
ANNA R. FORNEY, A. B., 
Professor of Harmony. 
URBAN H. HERSHEY, 
Teacher of the Violin. 

Literary Societies. 

CLIONIAN. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, President. 
Miss ELLA BLACK, Secretary. 

KAL OZETEAN. 
HARRY W. MAYER, President. 
LESLIE G. ENDERS, Secretary. 
PHILOKOSMIAN. 
CHARLES H. SLEICHTER, President. 
EDWIN K. RUDY, Secretary. 

Y. M. C. A. 
JOHN H. MAYSILLES, President. 
JAY W. YOE, Secretary. 

Y W. C. A. 
Miss ESTELLA STEHMAN, President. 
Miss CARRIE FLINT, Secretary. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 

The literary work of the Society has 
been very excellent since the opening of 
the present term and reflects great credit 
on the different members who take part on 
our programs. We feel confident that 
the work will continue, since each mem- 
ber is an earnest worker for the best in- 
terests of the Society. 



We were pleased to have with us on th e 
evening of the 27th ult. Rev. 0. E. Romig 
an ex-member of the Society, who encour! 
aged us by his presence and words f 
praise and encouragement. Messrs. J s 
Bomberger and Arthur Hoverter were 
also in attendance on the same evening, 
The Society welcomes its friends at all 
times and requests that their visits be 
more frequent. 

Our library has reached such a state 
that it was deemed a necessit} 7 to look for 
other quarters, and at present the room 
formerly occupied as a reading-room is be- 
ing wainscoted and papered and other- 
wise fitted up as a place for the library, 
which has completely outgrown its present 
quarters. 

The Society has decided to revive an 
old time custom of the P. L. S. by hold- 
ing a public meeting in the chapel on Fri- 
day evening, October 26, when the follow- 
ing program will be rendered : 

CHcmrs— Messrs. Snoke, Beattie, Anthony, Grove, 

C. Sleichter, Runkle, Heberly and Maysilles. 
Address of Welcome by President. 

Recitation N. C. Sleichter. 

Oration—" The Unchained Demon,". .J. R. Wallace, 

Solo, Clarence Snoke. 

Debate— "Resolved, that a lie is never justifiable." 

Affirmative, I. E. Albert, W. G. Clippinger; 

Negative, J. H. Maysilles, Jacob Zerb' j . 
Quartet— Messrs. Anthony, Beattie, Deibler and C. 

Sleichter. " Living Thoughts." 
Chorus. 

The friends of the Society are most cor- 
dially invited to be with us on this occa- 
sion. 

Messrs. A. S. Ulrich and R. P. Daugh- 
erty joined our ranks recently. The 
Society now has an active membership of 
thirty-six. 



Clionian Literary Society. 



Virtute et Fide. 



The earnestness with wh ch the Ch- 
onians entered into the work this month 
shows the determination to make the year 
a success. Throughout the month inter- 
esting and instructive programs bave 
been arranged and carefully prepared- 
Each member seems to see the benefit 8 
that can be derived from being a member 
of a literary society, and is seeking t0 
gain as many of the benefits as possible- 

Since the last issue the names of Mis«f 
Bender, Fetrow, McNair, Mumrna, K lD ' 
ports, Kephart and Kauffman have been 
added to our list. By this addition ]J 
realize that we have gained as many 
ing workers. 



THE COLLEGE IORUM. 



125 



' Messrs. Mayer and Stehman visited us 
on the evening of October 5. At the end 
of the program they addressed the Society 
in a very pleasing manner. 

Quite a great deal of fault has been 
found with the editor of the Society for 
stating in the last issue that we would 
welcome ex-Clionians to our meetings. 
She did not mean ex-Clionians only, but 
they in addition to whoever else may wish 
to come will always be sure of a hearty 
welcome. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 



Palma non sine pulvere. 



Our first month's work proved to be 
successful, and the members seemed to 
appreciate the importance of thorough 
preparation. Although our programs 
have not been long, there was just enough 
variety to make it interesting. We have 
realized thus far that the secret of suc- 
cess lies in thorough preparation, and that 
it cannot be obtained by numbers alone. 

The members are all resigned to the 
work, and feel the responsibility which 
rests upon them as soon as they enter its 
hall. May this be the ambition of its 
members during the year, and thus do 
credit to themselves as well as to the 
Society. 

The names of J. D. Stehman, of Mount- 
ville, and P. L. Meyer, of Bunker Hill, 
have been added to our list of members 
during the past month. 

Rev. W. H. Artz, of Tylersburg, 
Uarion Co., visited friends at school on 
we 24th ult. He reports having abundant 
success in the work of the Master. 
. R ev. C. A. Mutch, of Williamstown, 
visited friends at school on the 24th ult. 

Rev. TJ. Gr. Renn, of Oberlin, paid a 
y^it to the school on the 2d inst. Rev. 



Renn 



was formerly an active member of 



Society, and his words , 
m $ appreciated by the Society 



were very 



are certainly glad to have our ex- 



mbers come and pay us a visit, because 
always appreciate their presence. 
spe . all desire to make this term one of 
result effort ' and thereby reap precious 



hoS! Ward Enders s P end 0ct - 6 - 8 at nis 
t r i p f m Eliza bethville, making the entire 
P> iorty mii es each way, on his wheel. 



Personals. 



Miss Mary McNair and Mrs. Nissley, 
of Middletown, spent Sunday, the 20th 
ult., with Miss McNair's sister Ella. 

Chas. H. Sleichter spent the 24th ult. 
in Harrisburg. 

Edward Anthony enjoyed a bicycle trip 
to his home, in Chambersburg, over Sun- 
day, the 23d ult. 

A Freshman is desirous of knowing if 
Cataline is feminine ; also the meaning of 
" lap-sided." A Senior can probably give 
the desired information. 

Mrs. Orth, of Middletown, grandmother 
of Miss Fetro, enjoyed a pleasaut visit to 
the College last month. 

Joji K. Irie, a classical graduate of 
Syracuse University, N. Y., and a native 
of Japan, spent several days during the 
latter part of last month as the guest of 
Pres. Bierman. He was much pleased 
with the institution and contemplates 
taking post-graduate work here. 

Miss Emma C. Hartman, of Sacramento, 
Pa., was here also with the view of arrang- 
ing for special work. 

The Women's Missionary Society, which 
convened at Avon, Pa., visited the College 
in a body on the 27th ult. 

Rev. S. L. Swartz, of Middletown, one 
of the Trustees of the College, was with 
us on the 28th. 

Rev. U. S. G. Renn, of Oberlin Station, 
was with us in the general prayer meeting 
on Tuesday evening, the 2d inst. He 
was on his way to attend the East Penn- 
sylvania Conference, to be held at Ephrata. 

A Glee Club, with Prof. Lehman as 
leader, was organized on Tuesday, the 2d. 
This is what the College wants, and it 
promises to develop and ultilize much of 
the excellent musical talent of our young 
men. 

What has become of the Prohibition 
Club? Has it been swallowed up by 
" hard times," or have its members gone 
on a spree ? 

The " College carpeters," Albert and 
Yoe, are making good progress toward 
fitting out the new room for the P. L. S. 
library. 

President Bierman and Professors Leh- 
man and Good were in attendance at the 
East Pennsylvania Conference held at 
Ephrata, Oct. 4-7. 



4 



126 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The Chestnut Picnic. 

After chapel exercises on Thursday, 
October 11, Mr. Garman, president of 
the Junior class, announced that on Fri- 
day, the day following, the class would 
give the annual Junior Chestnut Picnic 
and invited the faculty and students to 
join them at the Ladies' Hall. The ap- 
plause that followed bespoke the appre- 
ciation and hearty acceptance of the 
students. 

At 7:30 o'clock the merry crowd left 
amid class 3 r ells, songs and the discordant 
notes of a score of tin horns. The ride in 
the large wagons was an enjoyable one; 
cornfields and orchards were not left un- 
disturbed as they were passed. When 
the destination was reached it was found 
to be the popular summer resort, Mt. 
Gretna. On arriving at the park the 
hunt began. Chestnuts were plentiful, 
and with the supply that the Juniors were 
kind enough to furnish, all had enough 
and plenty to take home. 

After all had viewed the points of inter- 
est about the park and enjoyed a ride on 
the gravity road the grand march was be- 
gun and was followed by many popular 
out-door games. Mr. Maysilles, '95, pro- 
posed the toast, "Our Juniors," to which 
Mr. Reber responded in behalf of the 
Senior class; Mr. Albert in behalf of the 
Sophomore class ; Mr. Yoe in behalf of the 
Freshman class, and Mr. Clippinger in 
behalf of the Preparatory Department. 
The beautiful day and the mountain air 
was an impetus for enjoyment and gave 
all good appetites for the repast which 
the Juniors had prepared. 

After the evening lunch had been dis- 
posed of and a few more games indulged 
in, the merry party, somewhat loath to 
leave the place of enjoyment, began their 
moonlight journey towards L. V. C. The 
mountain air was filled with sweet music, 
occasionally interspersed with the notes 
of those "horrid" tin horns. 

Although tired and with weak voices, 
there was enough energy left to inform 
the people of Annville that the picnic was 
a grand success. The thanks of many 
grateful hearts are again extended to the 
class of '96. 



A HINT. 

Father dear, and mother too, 

I'm gittin' rather sneezy ; 
My summer pants are wearin' through, 

And gittin' rather breezy. 



Exchange Jottings. 



The following exchanges, to each of 
which we extend a hearty welcome, have 
been received the past month. 

The Pathfinder, Indian Helper, Bid 
inson Seminary Journal, Washington 
Jeffersonian, Student's Pen, School Rec- 
ord, High School Times, Dayton, 0, 
The H. S. Reflector, The Oracle, Maiden! 
Mass., Light, Lynn H. S. Gazette, Lyman 
School Enterprise, University Press, 
College Life, Drury Howler, Nemosynean, 
No?-mal College Echo, Cyaka, H. & 
Mercury, Pacific Wave and I). R. S, 
Items. 



Why Not Make Pictures?.,.. 



WHEN, WITH THE 

Premo Camera, 



GUARANTEE IT, and you can do 
the Work Yourself. 

Prices, 4x5 Size, $12 to $30; 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 




ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




Success is so Certain that WE 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



12T 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Trains. 



No.12 



Lv. Winchester 

■i Martinsburg . ... 

1 Hagerstown 

» Greencastle 

» Cbambersburg .. 

" Shippensburg 

«• Newville 

•' Carlisle 

" Mechaniosburg.. 
Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia., 

New York 

Baltimore 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 
A. M. 



Ky'e 
Exp 



No. 2 



A. M. 

6 15 
700 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
9 40 

10 04 



10 25 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 
P. M. 



Mr'g 
Mail 



10 30 

125 
4 03 
3 10 

P. M. 



Day 
Exp 



No. 6 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
140 



2 00 
6 50 



6 45 
P. M. 



Ev'g 
Mail 



No. 8 



P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 

4 10 

4 36 

5 00 
5 30 

5 51 

6 17 
6 43 



7 05 

11 15 
3 50 
10 40 

P. M. 



N'gt 
Exp 

No. 10 

P. M. 
320 
4 50 
710 
736 
8 00 
8 16 

8 53 

9 20 
9 43 

10 05 
A. M. 
4 30 
7 33 
6 20 
AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham 
bersburg. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York.. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



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" Dillsburg 

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" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 
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" Greencastle 

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" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 


P. M. 


A. M. 


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A. M. 


11 40 


4 45 


853 


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800 


12 15 




900 


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4 30 


8 50 


11 50 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


4 40 


753 


12 40 


3 40 


5 03 


8 13 


1 03 


4 01 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


425 


5 55 


900 


1 52 


455 


6 15 


9 21 


2 13 


5 10 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


5 35 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 50 


725 


10 27 


3 25 


6 18 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 


11 00 


12 00 




7 50 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 



No.17 

P. M. 

215 
200 
2 20 

P. M. 

5 20 



5 41 

6 05 



6 57 

7 20 



No. 9 

P. M. 
4 23 
2 06 
4 30 

P. M. 

8 00 

8 20 

8 44 

9 08 
9 29 
9 50 

10 12 
10 35 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. ]0:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
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Pertaining ri of ,»> formation about rates and other matters 

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128 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

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West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. Kit KID Kit. J>0. £. HEBR. 

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U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
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Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.00. 
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Invested Assets $146,809.91 

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30 
81 
82 
38 
34 
85 
86 
37 
88 
39 



90 
92 
94 
96 
98 
1 00 
1 06 
1 12 
1 18 
1 24 



130 
1 40 
150 
160 
1 70 
180 
192 



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Volume VII 



Number 9. 



THE 



us 



College Forum 



NOVEMBER, 1894. 



. f CONTENTS: * • 



November, 129 

Our Summer Pilgrimage, 129-133 

The Unchained Demon, 133-135 



Eul 



°gy> 135, 13G 

j^lege Jollity, 136 

Editorials, 137 

Jaior's Rhetorical] ............ 7. .' . . .137, 138 

heYl M - C. A. State Convention, .... 138^ 139 



Philokosmian Literary Society . 139" 

Kalozetean Literary Society, 139, 140 

Clionian Literary Society, 140 

Exchanges, 140, 141 

Personals, 141, 142 

Maori Shorthand, 142 

Advertisements, .... 142-144 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
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22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
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O 
K 
< 

u u 

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o 
a 

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H 

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THE COLLEGE FOEUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



"Vol. VII. No. 9. ANNVILLE, PA., NOVEMBER, 1894. Whole No. 75. 



November. 



Through naked bough no more resounds 

The magic tinkle of the breeze ; 
But now the mighty blast rebounds 

In tones, whose melodies appease 
That sad, lone sear, old autumn-tide ; 

His heart by grief so cruelly fraught, 
Is cheered and peacefully doth bide 

The hoary winter's grave onslaught. 

The peaceful life in rural wold — 

A solitude entirely mute, 
Save for the lay of lovers bold 

Who strike rich chords on love's soft lute — 
Is wakened by the merry tune, 

From many a joyous huntsman's horn, 
Enwrapt in some soft breeze's croon, 

As blithely gay as autumn morn. 

Oh Year ! why pause thee on thy way, 

And with a backward, parting glance 
At all the joys of autumn gay, 

Move sadly now in Time's swift dance? 
*or soon when thou dost surely know 

One life alone to thee belongs, 
With joyous face to death you'll go 

And meet its claims with cheering songs. 

^^ber, stern but gracious too, 

Who soon shall pass through Time's worn 
. stile, 

4 long farewell I say to you 

in this thy last and fleeting while. 
AD , month ! the cheering thought that thrills 
lRtw I l r i lestly P ines and stormy skies, 
i • the vales ani saddened hills, 
*gain thy pow'r shall realize. 

N. COLE8TOCK SCHLICHTER, '97. 



Our Summer Pilgrimage. 

prof. h. u. roop, a. m. 

of th the early days of Jul y> wiien the ra J 8 

to S ] Summer sun were causing all nature 
met °7 Wittl fervent neat > two pilgrims 
<ttsti? * tUrned their faces toward the lake 
not m ° f Central New York - We were 
den ts ere Pleasure seekers, but earnest stu- 
kno^j ^ nxious to feed the appetite for 
w e Co e if 6 wituin °ur own souls, so that 
better communicate to others 



some of the inspiration gained from actual 
contact with enthusiastic educators. 

We were not equipped with scallop 
shell and pilgrim staff as were the palmers 
of olden time, but, in their stead, we found 
a "gripsack," and a billet de voyage over 
the very picturesque Northern Central 
Railroad, very convenient substitutes. 
For, even if we do deplore the fact that 
the materialistic tendencies of the age are 
destructive of romance, or do sympathize 
with Ruskin in his lament that " there is 
scarcely a quiet valley that is not filled 
with the bellowing fire of the locomotive," 
yet, as a matter of personal convenience, 
we believe that very few persons would 
cheerfully or willingly exchange the facil- 
ities and even luxuries of modern travel 
for the primitive methods of locomotion 
of the Canterbury Pilgrims, albeit they 
had mine host of the Tabard Inn for an 
escort. Even the narrow dimensions of a 
car window gave visions of beaut}', shifting 
panoramas of mountain, forest and river, 
that gladdened the eye and rested the tired 
brain, and will remain as permanent pic- 
tures on memory's walls long after vaca- 
tion days are ended. Such were some of 
' the thoughts that passed through our 
minds as the demon of steam hastened us 
through the great lumber region of Penn- 
sylvania. 

After leaving Harrisburg, our first stop- 
ping place of any length was Williams- 
port — well known as a lumber centre. 

On our way to this city we enjoyed 
magnificient scenery, having the pictur- 
esque Susquehanna upon the left side of 
our car. 

The grandeur of the river, correspond- 
ing with that of the mountain, formed a 
majestic and solemn scene; ideas of im- 
mensity swelled and exalted our minds at 
the sight. These scenes were ours to en- 
joy for many miles. 

We spent several hours in Williams- 



130 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



port, visiting friends and different points 
of interest. Here is located Dickinson 
Seminary, a large and progressive school 
for both sexes, under the auspices of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, the Rev. E. 
G. Gray, D. D., President. 

In the evening we rode around the city 
on a motor, and as we were approaching 
the river, the city seemed to be perpetu- 
ally changing with the winding bank ; but 
this vision vanished as we advanced, and 
we perceived the city lying along a curv- 
ing shore, apparently near the foot of the 
cliffs, which were finely fringed with wood, 
over which evening was drawing her 
sweetest coloring. As we pursued the 
line, the heights on either hand gradually 
softened ; the country beyond showed 
remote mountains less wild and aspiring 
than those we had left, and the blooming 
tint, which had invested the distance, 
deepened to a dusky purple, and then 
vanished in the gloom of twilight. 

Early the next morning we continued 
our journey. Our iron steed seemed to 
breathe very heavily as it carried us on- 
ward and upward through Northern Penn- 
sylvania, the Switzerland of America. 
The scenery was beautiful, especially 
when a somewhat abrupt turn in the road 
revealed the bright rays of the morning 
sun to our view, like a picture from which 
the curtain is suddenly lifted. We soon 
crossed over into New York State, and 
then one hour's ride brought us to our 
destination, Ithaca. 

Ithaca is a city of about twelve thous- 
and inhabitants and is situated at the 
head of Cayuga Lake, one of the little 
group of lakes that hang like a cluster of 
bean pods near the centre of the Empire 
State. The city is well built, easy df 
access, and has many verj attractive 
homes, while its lake and environing hills 
and glens make it a delightful place of 
summer residence. It contains a number 
of attractive and prosperous churches, 
Congregationalism taking the lead, due 
largely to the fact that this region was 
chiefly settled by New Englanders. 

But Cornell University, not Ithaca, 
was our objective point. It stands upon 
the side of a high hill, at a distance of 
about half a mile from the centre of the 
city. This University, incorporated by 
the Legislature of New York State on 
the 27th of April, 1865, and opened on 
the 7th of October, 1868, is the result of 
the combined wisdom and bounty of the 



United States, the State of New York 
and Ezra Cornell. Congress provided 
that there should be granted to the sey. 
eral States public lands, "thirty thousand 
acres for each Senator and Representative 
of Congress, from the sale of which there 
should be established a perpetual fund, 
" the interest of which shall be inviolably 
appropriated, by each State which may 
take and claim the benefit of this act, to 
the endowment, support and maintenance 
of at least one college where the leading 
object shall be, without excluding other 
scientific and classical studies, and in- 
eluding military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to 
agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such 
manner as the Legislatures of the States 
may respectively prescribe, in order | 
promote the liberal and practical educa- 
tion of the industrial classes in the several 
pursuits and professions in life." h 
portion of the aforesaid fund, nor the in- 
terest thereon, could be used for the pur- 
chase, erection, or maintenance of any 
buildings ; but States benefiting by the 
provisions of the act were required to 
provide at least one college within five 
years. 

Nine hundred and ninety thousand 
acres was the share of the State of P 
York, and by an act passed May 5, ^< 
eight thousand acres were sold at eighty- 
three cents, and sixty-eight thousand 
acres at eighty-five, aggregating sixty- 
four thousand four hundred and fort) 
dollars. But these sales soon ceased, be- 
cause other States were offering their"'' 
at a much lower rate. 

During the meantime Ezra Cornell ^ 
that, by a union bf his own resource- 
with the proceeds of the land grafit'f 
could found an institution where any 
son can find instruction in any st 
This union was affected and result* 
establishing Cornell University. , f 

The sales of this land aggregated i 
sum of four million dollars, and it i s 1 
this fund, increased by private ^ ene ^ 
tions, to about eight millions, that j 
rapid growth of the institution W s 
suited. C5 i 

As to the material setting of ^ e ^ 
versity very much might be said- 



campus is a beautifully cu 
of land, containing upwards 
acres, stretching along a bluff ".'^ 
overlooking Cayuga Lake, 
twenty miles in length, and two i n 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



131 



the water being of a bright silver, color. 
Within this tract stand the twenty- 
six massive buildings of the University, 
the President's residence, numerous 
homes of professors, and many pictur- 
esque chapter houses of fraternities. The 
white marble library building, with its 
graceful campanile and its melodious chime 
of bells, is the most imposing building of 
the group, and the most attractive be- 
cause of the treasure it stores. This 
building, erected in 1891 at a cost of 
nearly $300,000, has shelf room for 475,- 
000 volumes, and its reading room will 
accommodate more than two hundred 
readers. The library building, with its 
endowment of $300,000, is the gift of 
Honorable Henry W. Sage, who has also 
given to the University its college chapel, 
and the Sage College, where the women 
students are even luxuriously housed. 
Would that our College had such a liberal- 
minded and generous-hearted friend! 
During the past year, of the more than 
eighteen hundred students in attendance, 
two hundred were women, and the univer- 
sity register records that " in each term 
of each course the average marks of the 
women have been higher than those of 
the men pursuing the same studies." 

Carrying out the generous and demo- 
cratic principles of its founder, Ezra 
Cornell, this University for the past three 
years has, by means of its summer school, 
given to teachers and advanced students 
a n opportunity to avail themselves of 
university methods of instruction in their 
own special departments of work. This 
summer school, like that of the University 
°f Chicago, is an integral part of the 
institution, and the same credit is given, 
lor the same amount and kind of work 
that would be granted during the regular 
terms. During the past summer about 
twee hundred students, among them not 
a few grey haired professoren and profess- 
°" Un enjoyed the exceptional facilities 
°ttered in the following subjects : Lan- 
| u ^ges, ancient and modern and English, 
nUosophy, thirteen courses, Pedagogy, 
°htical Economy, Law, Mathematics, 
^teen courses, Physics, Chemistry, 

Eh*'- ? eol °^ Dewing 
mechanical and 



and Art, 



^ —aa,! auu Architectural Drawing, 
Perimental Engineering, etc.; a number 



Of A\a- 

pierent courses in each 

Writ r °? SSOr Jolm Evans 
coi 6rS ass0(na te pilgrim, pursued a 
urse in Mathematics, viz.: Differential 



subject. 
Lehman, the 



Equations, and the writer one course in 
English Literature, one in Psychology, 
and another in Experimental Psychology. 
To us was given every opportunity for 
original research — by the large working 
library of the University — under the guid- 
ance and with the assistance of very able 
professors. That we enjoyed the work 
need not be stated. 

Nor were these all the advantages. We 
had the privilege of hearing a number of 
excellent lectures by prominent men. 

The first lecture was given by the Rev. 
Dr. Griffis, the popular pastor of the Con- 
gregationalist Church. He is an attract- 
ive pulpit orator, an author of considerable 
reputation, and a very frequent contrib- 
utor to the Golden Rule. 

His subject was " The Dutch Influence 
in American History." He announced 
himself a firm unbeliever in most Ameri- 
can Histor}' text books. The story of 
our country is made to run about like 
this : A long time ago, some very good 
men were driven out of England ; they 
came to this country in a ship called the 
Mayflower, landed on Plymouth Rock, 
and from them all true Americans are 
descended. 

This he declared to be a provincial view 
and entirely wrong. He said that Dutch 
history is shamefully neglected. While 
professional chairs of German, French, 
Spanish and Italian are familiar, there 
was no professor of Dutch in America — 
no historian who reads Dutch. Even Ban- 
croft had to employ a young man who 
could read the language to go to Holland 
and search the archives for him. 

The lecturer gave a large number of 
facts, showing that the precedents for our 
institutions are found more in republican 
Holland than in monarchical England. 
In 15t9the United States of the Nether- 
lands was formed, and had a red, white 
and blue flag for an emblem. They had a 
States-General, representing the sover- 
eignty of the states. All the phrases, 
"Liberty or Death," "The Union For- 
ever," and many others, were shouted in 
Holland two hundred years before our 
Declaration of Independence was signed. 
In colonial times a Plymouth town looked 
more like a Dutch village than an English 
borough. 

When our Declaration of Independence 
was read in Holland, worded much like a 
similar instrument they had written, it 
enlisted sympathy at once. The United 



132 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



States was recognized as independent ; 
Dutch officers enlisted in our army ; John 
Adams was received and welcomed ; and 
money was loaned our government just 
in time to pay its almost mutinous sol- 
diers. 

Dr. Griffis told us that it was ridiculous 
to say that our Constitution was copied 
after anything in England — that nearly all 
the Puritan leaders had been educated in 
Holland — that those who wrote the Con- 
stitution, while men of practical affairs, 
were educated men, and men who, as the 
debates distinctly show, had vividly be- 
fore them the Dutch institutions. 

Dr. Griffis gave another interesting and 
very instructive address in the Christian 
Association Hall, donated to the Univer- 
sity for social and religious purposes by 
A. S. Barnes, on the timely subject, " The 
Relations of China and Japan in Corea." 

In contrasting the two countries, the 
speaker said that China stands for old 
age. She has had above a score of 
dynasties ; and her language, civilization 
and social ideas are hardly changed. The 
country is under a false philosophy and 
religion, which have developed into super- 
stition. Yet, nowhere are property 
rights more secure, or the family rela- 
tions better upheld. 

Japan is a distinctively different coun- 
try. They are not of the same origin as 
the Chinese. They came from the North- 
ern highlands, the Chinese from a min- 
gling of Northern barbarian blood with 
that of the ancient, inhabitants of China. 
The language of the two countries is en- 
tirely distinct. Early in this century the 
Japanese were steeped in superstition, 
and isolated by their exclusive policy 
from other nations. About the middle of 
the century they began to see the advan- 
tages of Western civilization. 

Corea has suffered from her geograph- 
ical position and her history is one of 
war. 

In view of the wretched state of civili- 
zation in China, the speaker could not 
wish that war be 'averted. War with 
Japan would open the eyes of China to 
the benefits of civilization. 

The last lecture given to the students 
was by President Schurman, who had just 
returned from his studies in Englaud. 
He spoke of the social and educational 
tendencies in England. He was sur- 
prised at the changes of fifteen years in 
educational and political life Universi- 



ties and intermediate schools are teaching 
more subjects ; more students are coming 
from all classes of the common people, 
To-day the English masses are not grow- 
ing up in ignorance. 

The adaptability of England to modern 
tendencies was very acceptably noticed, 
England, while holding tenaciously to 
what is established, grasps the new phases 
with broad democratic spirit, and binds 
them about her older institutions. 

He said there were many very ordinary 
men in Parliament ; the average ability in 
the best of our State Legislatures is as 
high as that of the English Parliament, 
because he did not think that there was a 
man in Parliament that could compare 
with Senator John Sherman, or with 
Reed or Wilson. As a result, more work 
is done in the committees, and the great 
speeches are not heard. 

Another great change is the multiplica- 
tion of parties. The Conservatives and 
Liberals, nominally existing, are divided 
into as many factions as there are classes 
and interests. The Irish part}' will concern 
itself little about the Empire until it gets 
home rule. The Welsh wanted secondary 
education and they secured it, and they 
have recently been promised disestablish- 
ment of the" State Church. More signifi- 
cant still is the Workingmen's party. 

England is thought conservative; hut 
in reality she is seething hot ; in some 
respects hotter than our own democratic 
country. This democratic wave is not 
confined to England. In Germany it lS 
Socialism, in France anarchy, in America 
the great strike in Chicago. 

President Schurman says that in some- 
things England is actually looking to us 
as an example, while fifteen years ago sue 
would have thought such a thing redicu- 
lous. With the growth of democracy, 
they fear the omnipotent' power of ParH* 
ment, and look with envy upon ° u 
written National and State Constitutions, 
which restrict the powers of our legislate 
bodies. * 

The speaker said that he never W 
Europe with a deeper feeling of the 
sponsibility devolving upon the A merl y 
people to make the great Republic wj^ 
the founders believed it would D ®T" a n 
model, the aspiration and the ideal tov 
the nations of the world. fl y 

These are only a few of the # 
scenes that charmed our eyes and ^ 
ested our thoughts. The pleasure oi 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



133 



pilgrimage shall never be forgotten. 
Lasting impressions were made, manj*- 
new acquaintances formed, and a stronger 
belief in the utility of good summer 
schools confirmed. To be brought in 
touch with earnest and enthusiastic work- 
ers is always stimulatiug and inspiring, 
while, for some of us, new ideas and fresh 
methods of instruction imported an added 
and lasting charm to the old story with 
which many writers have been delighting 
the world for more than a thousand years, 
the story which we call our English 
literature. 



The Unchained Demon. 

AN ORATION DELIVERED BEFORE THE P. L. S. 
BY J. R. WALLACE, '95. 



Some twenty-eight centuries ago Homer 
sang his lofty songs of heroes and of war. 

About four centuries ago Martin Luther 
in the realm of the Oriental land preached 
eternal vengeance against the Vatican. 

But to-day every true American who 
believes in the enlightenment of this mag- 
nificent and glorious America can sing 
and preach about the great source of pov- 
erty and crime, weakness and shame, dying 
and dead men by the wayside. 

Think for a moment of the golden grain 
as it waves to and fro in the fleeting sum- 
mer days ! How the farmer fills his gar- 
ners with these precious treasures which 
uod has sent to preserve life ; but here 
comes the imitator of the devil ; kills the 
vital principle by distillation, and thus the 
grain is touched by the fatal hand of decay 
a »a becomes a living demon. 

there has in all ages and climes been a 
jendency to the improper use of alcohol. 

°ah, as if disgusted with the prevalence 

Bv?v r in - his time ' took to stron g drink, 
y this vice Alexander the Conqueror 
as conquered. By wealth and drunken- 
ess the great Roman Empire fell, 
ciro 1US ° n ' ^ e the ceaseless ages of time, 
ever um na vigating the globe, traversing 
and COr ! t ' inen t, touching at every island 
ar(J P* an ting on every seashore the stand- 
it sw c . on( l uei 'or. And at this moment 
p, re j 1 ^ 8 ^s sceptre over a mightier em- 
in tK • Ale *ander or Napoleon ever saw 

f h ^ lr j;osiest dreams, 
its snV S a tyrant, it everywhere rules 

thei r S With the rod of iron ' taking 
Dllr se, their time, their health, their 



usefulness, their happiness, every fibre of 
the body and every power of the soul. 

Continuing on in our investigation, cir- 
cumstances show that this demon occa- 
sions poverty and produces crime, de- 
stroys moral sentiments and human life. 

First, then, does it occasion poverty and 
produce crime? The drink bill of the 
United States in 1891 was about twelve 
millions of dollars, an amount larger than 
the cost of our civil service, army, navy, 
Congress and public school system. 

One million of our population are sup- 
ported by the traffic. The laws of nearly 
all the States give it a strong moral sup- 
port. Politicians, editors and parties are 
bought and sold by it. Appetite and 
fashion, prejudice and law defend it. 
Every villainy in the land is ready to 
stand up in its defence and every element 
of human depravity rallies to its support. 

But its pernicious influence does not 
stop here. Facts show that nine-tenths 
of all the crimes are directly due to this 
source. There is no home so beautiful 
but it may be devastated by this awful 
curse. Where once reigned wealth, joy 
and love, it has turned these into poverty, 
misery and hatred, having for its result 
houses without windows, gardens without 
fences, fields without tillage, barns with- 
out roofs, marriage without love, children 
without clothing, principles, morals or 
manners. 

Second, then, does it destroy moral sen- 
timents and human life? This brings be- 
fore our minds, the distiller, the buyer 
and the consumer; but the consumer is 
naturally thought to be the most blame- 
worthy. 

His manner of life prevents even his 
family from acquiring a culture and re- 
finement conducive to moral sentiments. 
Men very often seek the fountain of in- 
toxication when the trials of sorrow, an- 
xiety and disappointment come to sweep 
away the memories of an ill-spent life. 
In so doing they see deep sadness settle 
like evening shadows upon the faces 
whom they love. They begin to realize 
their condition, weep, pray, resolve and 
struggle ; but a grip of steel is upon them. 
The resolutions of one hour are scat- 
tered like chaff the next. On they go 
through dishonor, sorrow and wrong over 
the ruins of character, happiness and 
hope, over the bleeding forms of innocence 
and love, trampling upon human com- 
passion and God's law till they die " as 



134 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the fool dieth," and the grave swallows 
up their ruined bodies and eternal dark- 
ness engulfs their ruined souls. 

Let the voices of the seventy thousand 
drunkards who last year went down to 
dishonored graves give answer. 

Let us go to the graveyard and listen 
to their sepulchral groans. " Oh ! thou 
terrible foe ! Liquor was thy victim." 
War sla} r s his thousands ; but thou slayest 
th} r tens of thousands. 

This is the history of hundreds of 
savages and sages, philosophers and poets, 
statesmen and patriots, thousands of 
Democrats and Republicans, and a small 
number of those who professed to belong 
to the Prohibition party. 

Let us cross the great waters to Hol- 
land and see one hundred and seventy gin 
distilleries in one city. Pass on to the 
great city, London, and compare it to our 
giant river, the Mississippi, rolling down 
through the fertile plains of the West. 

Last year these people swallowed 
1,030,000,000 gallons of spirits, enough to 
form a lake fifteen feet deep, one hun- 
dred and twenty feet wide and ten miles 
long. 

The city of reeling men with 4,000,000 
inhabitants and 190,000 licensed houses; 
the city of the blood stained hand with 
its 700,000 criminal inhabitants ; the city 
of iron doors with its 30,000 human be- 
ings confined in prisons ; the city of the 
men in blue with its 51,000 policemen re- 
quired mainly through drink ; the city of 
the pale cheek requiring 18,000 doctors 
when 4,000 would be sufficient, but for 
alcohol ; the city of the tireless grate and 
all the misery which helps to raise the 
bitter cry of outcast London ; the city of 
the drink slain dead with its daily aver- 
age of three hundred and thirty victims. 

Shall it be said of this great river, men 
may come and men may go, but I roll on 
forever ? 

This great foe cuts down youth in its 
vigor, manhood in its strength and age in 
its weakness ; it breaks the father's heart ; 
extinguishes natural affections, blights 
parental hope and brings down mourning 
age in sorrow to the grave. It produces 
weakness, not strength ; sickness, not 
health; death, not life. It makes wives 
widows, children orphans and father's 
fiends ; it feeds rheumatism, invites 
cholera, embraces consumption ; it covers 
the land with idleness misery and crime, 
fills your jails, supplies your almshouses 



and demands your asylums ; it respects 
the thief, hates life, scorns virtue and 
slanders innocence ; it burns up men 
consumes women, detests life, curses God 
and despises heaven; it degrades the 
citizen, dishonors the statesman and dis- 
arms the patriot. It brings shame, not 
honor ; despair, not hope ; and misery, 
not happiness ; it ruins morals, slays 
reputation, wipes out mental honors, then 
curses the world and laughs at its ruin; 
it does all this and more ; it is the 
son of villianies, the mother of all abom- 
inations, the devil's best friend and God's 
worst enemy. 

Several methods might now be sug- 
gested to destroy this traffic ; but it is 
believed that the proper methods will 
come when the occasion for them comes. 

Public sentiment must first be aroused. 
But before it can be aroused, the people 
must be brought face to face with the fact 
that this demon is a foe to civilization. 
Some people claim that this evil can be 
regulated by tax. They might as well try 
to regulate the Asiatic cholera, or the 
small pox by taxation. The men who dis- 
til liquors are, for the most part, unscru- 
pulous ; and the higher the tax, the more 
inducements for distillation. New York 
produces forty thousand gallons of whis- 
key every twenty-four hours in distil- 
leries, cellar vaults and sheds, and most 
of it escapes the tax. 

Think of the folly of the government 
trying to restrain this evil by tax! 1' 
every flask of wine produced should he 
taxed a thousand dollars, it would not he 
enough to compensate for the tears it has 
wrung out of the eyes of widows and or- 
phans, nor for the blood it has dashed 
against the altars of the Christian Cburcli- 
Again, a great number of Temperance 
workers claim that permanent reform c an 
come only through religion. This sta r 
ment is not true. If there is such a tniDs 
as sin, the liquor traffic is the greatest o 
this earth. If Jesus Christ establish^ 
his Church for the very purpose of sa^ 1 1 
human society from its sins, then ■ 
highest sin that curses society sDOt ^ 
command its foremost attention. T u ft . 
logical ; but what church acts acco 
ingly ? The Church is busy making P ^ 
believe right ; but how many make 
people live right. m 
If the Church is a proper organi^J 
for saving men out of drunkenness, 
by sound logic it ought to be a p r " 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



135 



organization to keep people from falling 
in J drunkenness. 

How many congregations teach their 
youths more than prayer and to keep good 
company ? How many teach their youths 
that cleanliness, proper food, ample sleep 
and avoidance of excitement are necessary 
to keep the young from falling into the 
depths of this craven stimulation. To 
the church the body is nothing, the soul 
everything, but with all its power it can- 
not divorce soul and body without mak- 
ing trouble for humanity and grief for 
itself. If a man believes in God and acts 
for the devil where will he go to when he 
dies? That is a question. 

Men profess to be Christians ; but when 
election day comes they openly violate 
God's law by voting for men who further 
the cause of drunkenness. Is this not a 
great sin? Has Christianity any use for 
such men? Did John the Baptist fear 
Herod when he preached repentance? 
Did the three Hebrew children stop and 
think of their minority when they went 
into the fiery furnace ? Their courage -in 
standing alone for God gave them a place 
in history that will be honored while the 
world stands. This nation wants just 
such characters, having for their mottoes, 
faith, example, principle and patriotism to 
encounter the whirlpools of a treacherous 
sea, whose shores are strewn with wrecked 
souls. 

Let every man plant his vote from now 
on so that on the day of final reckoning 
he can bear witness before God tnat he 
stood up in his day and generation as 
utterly opposed to this living demon which 
has traversed our land. 

Then will thousands spring from the 
slumbering depths of darkness, anguish 
a nd sorrow, to the realm of light, freedom 
and love. 

, Then will fair Columbia lead the world 
|u matters of reform, being grander than 
tn e mountains of Switzerland and more 
sa cred than the banks of the Jordan. 

fhen will God look down upon a new 
Israel redeemed from the fetters of King 
of . ohol, Prospering in the glorious light 
an unbroken peace and sailing ever on- 

ar d to the heights of glory and fame. 



Eulogy. 



fiv ^ rit i s h Museum is to be enlarged, 
ad*] a"* one_naif acres °f l and having been 
ecl to the nine already occupied. 



Once more the Nation i? called to 
mourn the loss of a son. 

The last of a group of New England 
poets has been laid to rest. He who per- 
sisted in remaining a boy throughout his 
life and opposed the idea of growing old, 
has answered the summons from his God 
and has gone to a world where infirmities 
are unknown. His burial was not attended 
with that great display which is charac- 
teristic in the last solemn rites of such a 
man, but there was none the less mourn- 
ing for the departed poet. 

The literary world realizes that the 
vacancy made by the death of this one 
will not soon be filled, since his equal has 
not yet been found. 

His writings show that he was a man 
of no ordinary ability. The deep feeling 
and noble sentiment contained in his 
works convince the reader that he was a 
man of culture— a man who had digged 
deep into the mysteries of philosophic 
and scientific knowledge, and who was 
able to touch the feelings of men as the 
skillful musician touches the keys of his 
instrument. 

All nature responded to his ready pen 
and flowed forth in poetic song. In every 
rock was a poem for him. Every leaf 
was an inspiration to him, and the rip- 
pling brook made music for his higher 
being. 

His was a happy life and he was blest 
with many years in which to enjoy it. 

His mind remained vigorous after his 
body began to show signs of failing, thus 
enabling him to continue the work which 
gave him so much pleasure throughout 
his whole active life, but he is dead. The 
work of Oliver Wendell Holmes in this 
life is done. He has gone to a higher 
employment which shall never cease. 
There his song shall ever go up to his 
Creator with that beauty and grandeur of 
expression which are known only to the 

soul. . 

Oliver Wendell Holmes was born in 
1809, August 29, the same year in which 
England's "Grand Old Man," first saw 
the light, and both have lived through a 
period of very interesting history m either 
country. 

Both have seen wars declared, witli 
suffering and bloodshed. Each has seen 
the spirit of warfare overcome by that 
better and nobler spirit of arbitration, and 



4 



136 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



now, when death came to this one beloved, 
it was when the Nation was at peace. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes had lived through 
such times as try the character of men, 
but which, if met squarely, make the strong 
man that he was. He lived when the 
Nation was struggling against many op- 
posing influences. 

When questions of right and wrong 
were agitating the minds of political 
leaders ; when the Government was 
swayed to and fro, the great storms of 
National disturbances, which threatened 
to tear it from its moorings and cast it 
out upon the billows of destructive prin- 
ciples — through all these changing scenes 
he grew and developed into hardy man- 
hood. His life was indeed an inspiration 
for all; a good lesson to those who 
always look upon the dark side of life and 
think that the world is growing worse, 
and to those drones who never try to im- 
prove themselves or those about them. 
He had a heart for the race and a strong 
love for his native land. His education 
was begun at Andover in his early youth, 
but he finished his college course at Har- 
vard in 1829. It was soon after leaving 
College that he wrote " Old Ironsides," 
which saved the old ship " Constitution " 
from destruction, which made him famous 
first as a poet. 

About this time he began the study of 
medicine, but never practiced the profes- 
sion to any great extent. In 1839 he was 
chosen Professor of Physiology' in Dart- 
mouth College. In 1840 he married the 
daughter of Judge Chas. Jackson and 
about this time accepted a position as 
Professor of Anatomy and Physiology in 
his alma mater. During this period he 
wrote a number of volumes of medical 
science and also became somewhat of a 
tyceum lecturer. 

In 1846 he appeared as a poet and as 
such he was known until the time of his 
death. His writings had been upon 
almost every subject and always of the 
highest merit. 

His death came in the very sunshine of 
his life, but the fear of going did not 
cloud his last moments. Death to him 
was only a transmission to a nobler life 
and to greater accomplishments. His 
funeral day was one of sadness and 
mourning to all who knew him. 

The light of fair October was sombred 
by the overhanging clouds which made the 
occasion of his burial still more solemn. 



The drooping leaf shed the gentle rain 
drop as though in sadness at his depar. 
ture. The bells tolled out their plai 
melody announcing that he had gone 
bej^ond the reach of man's knowledge 
but he shall live long in the memories of 
those he loved. The ragged urchin on 
the street, the beggar by the wayside, and 
the sad-hearted everywhere in his native 
town shall miss him. He spoke alike to 
all, either in lowly cottage or in costly 
palace, and the kindness pictured on his 
noble face drew many to him who sought 
for sympathy. 

No better epitaph could be put upon his 
grave than " Here lies a man ; he lived 
not to himself alone." S. Garman, % 



College Jollity. 

Hardibus Greekibus, 

Long study for you ; 
Usibus ponibus, 

Help to get through. — Exchange, 

While Moses was no college man, 
And never played football ; 

In rushes he was said to be 
The first one of them all. — 1 



"Sweet maid," said he, 
"I ask of thee, 

To fly, to fly, to fly with me ;" 
"Young fellow," said she, 

Now don't you be, 

Too fly, too fly, too fly with me."-* 

He jumped across the garden fence, 
The bulldog was behind him ; 

He learned a little better sense, 
For the old man timed him. 

Student, teaching Sunday-school class- 
" Moreover, the dog licked the sores of 
Lazarus." 

Little boy — "What does moreover 
mean ? " 

Student — " Moreover is the name of the 
dog. " — Exchange. 

She had asked me 
Would I help her 
With her Latin. 
'Twas so hard, 
Would I help her? 
Mean, irregular 
Old word, 
Disco. She just 
Kept forgetting 
The subjunctive 
All the while ! 
Pretty lips so 
Near, so tempting 
To beguile ; 
Thought I'd teach her 
By example. 
Didicissem? 

1 should smile. —Exc 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



137 



EDITORS. 

H. CLAY DBANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 



1nmr H . MAY8ILLES, '95. IKA E. ALBERT, '97. 

jobbii- Walter G. Clippinger, '99. 

EXCHANGE EDITOR. 
Norman C. Schlichter, '97. 



ALCMNI E01T0R. 
Proe. John E. Lkhman, A. M., '74. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Estella Stehman, '96. 
Philofcosmian Society— W. Elmer Heilman. 
Kalozetean Society— Harry W. Mayer, '95. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-flre cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 

Editorial. 

The week of prayers under the auspices 
of the Y. M. C. A. has begun with an un- 
usually large attendance of students. 
Several are already at the altar for prayer. 



The College Association of the Middle 
States and Maryland meets on the last of 
this month at Johns Hopkins University. 
President Bierman will be in attendance. 



The transit of Mercury was seen only 
for a few minutes because of heavy clouds. 
Special arrangements had been made to 
aa ve it thrown on a screen for the benefit 
of all the students. 



Pamphlets on The Generation of Chlor- 
for Laboratory Purposes, and The 
detection of Alkaline Perchlorates Asso- 
rted wth Chlorides, Chlorates and 
grates, by Prof. Gooch and D. Albert 

1 eider, of Yale, are herein acknowledged. 



^ dying man's remark, " that my in- 
^ ence could be gathered up and buried 



flue 



but " mos ^ diking. Man dies, 
and ^ " 1 ^ uence surv i v e s him- It lives 
w °rks as long as time lasts. As it is 



an agency we are powerless to arrest, we 
should be most careful what kind of in- 
fluence we leave. Young people generally 
are very disregardful of their influence. 
The college student, more than others, 
exerts an influence that becomes a most 
potent factor in shaping the future of his 
fellow-student. If his deportment is un- 
gentlemanly, rude and not becoming a 
Christian, he loses the respect of all, while 
his influence is bad. How much good all 
might do, if they would be what they 
profess ! 



The anniversary of the Clionian Lit- 
erary Society will be held on Thanksgiv- 
ing evening. Miss Mary M. Shenk, of 
Annville, will give the annual address. 



Frequent inquiries have been made con- 
cerning the annual Alumni Banquet which 
is to be held at Lebanon during the holi- 
days. No information has been given us. 
We would refer all to Charles B. Rauch, 
Simon P. Light and Prof. Lehman, who 
are the committee. 



Seniors' Rhetorical. 

The first public rhetorical exercise by 
the present Senior Class of the College 
was given on last Saturday night, the 10th 
inst. The weather was fair, the air cool 
and bracing, and the attendance of inter- 
ested listeners large. The music was fur- 
nished by Misses Klinedinst and Stehman 
and Messrs. Hershey and Mayer, who 
acquitted themselves with great credit, 
and by the recently organized Glee Club 
under the instruction of Prof. Lehman. 
The Club sang well, was encored, and 
gives promise of great success. After 
brief introductory remarks by President 
Bierman and prayer by the Rev. M. J. 
Mumma, the members spoke in the follow- 
ing order : 

Mr. Harry W. Mayer took for his theme 
11 Our War Governor," and delivered a 
well-prepared oration. Andrew Gregg 
Curtin was a patriot, a statesman, an ora- 
tor and a Christian. He labored inces- 
santly to save the Union during the late 
rebellion ; he devised ways and means to 



138 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



care for the soldier, his widow and or- 
phaned children ; his eloquence aroused 
the patriotic citizens to duty in times of 
danger, and Ingersollism found no favor 
with him. 

Mr. Urban H. Hershey followed with a 
forcible oration on u The Church Choir." 
After discoursing on music in general 
and showing its beauties and varied 
effects on the human soul, he pleaded 
strongly for the support of the choir in 
church music. Music elevates, strength- 
ens and refines, attracts the wayward and 
comforts the sorrowing, and when under 
the direction of a well organized and de- 
voted choir, will tell for good in time and 
eternity. 

Mr. John R. Wallace delivered quite a 
strong oration on " What of the Future?" 
The tendency of our times is to concen- 
trate, to accumulate. Human rights are 
ignored, common interests are forgotten, 
sympathy for your neighbor's feelings 
finds no lodgment in many hearts nowa- 
days. The three great millionaires of 
Chicago, Field, Armour and Pullman, are 
turning blood, brawn and brain into dol- 
lars at the expense of the highest virtues. 
The contest between labor and capital 
continues, and unless higher principles 
will soon prevail the future will grow 
more uncertain. 

Mr. J. H. Reber won favor with the 
audience by delivering an able and chastely 
expressed oration on the subject, " Vis 
Consili Expers Mole Ruit Sua." There 
are two universally recognized principles 
in life, cause and effect. From the cause 
the effect may be known, and vice versa. 
Right plans may result in wise action, 
right motives in good work. Empires 
have fallen, kingdoms have crumbled into 
dust, and many so-called great men have 
failed because of defective substructure. 
Columbus discovered America, Grant 
captured Richmond, and Nellie Bly trav- 
eled around the world in less than ninety 
days, because their plans were well ma- 
tured. 

Mr. J. H. Maysilles gave a very able 
and logically arranged oration on " Two 
Isms." Evils frequently combine for un- 
holy purposes. There is an apparent 
affinity between the wrong doer and the 
seeker for gain. The true lover of his 
country finds to-day two enemies con- 
spiring to control our interests. Boodler- 
ism in politics corrupts legislation, de- 
feats justice in our courts and robs so- 



ciety of its manhood. Romanism seeks 
to control men in public life by an appeal 
to their weaknesses, to secure public funds 
to promote its private interests, and de- 
bases the motives of officials in the highest 
positions to unholy purposes. 

The music prepared for the occasion 
was all that could be desired, the orations 
were thoughtful and well delivered, and 
the lai-ge audience present was attentive 
and went away gratified. 



The Y. M. C. A. State Convention. 



The Twenty-seventh Annual Conven- 
tion of the Y. M. C. A., held at Johns- 
town, Pa., October 18-21, was in everj 
respect a successful one. 

The delegates began to arrive from the 
East and West in the morning, and in 
afternoon assembled in the Franklin 
street M. E. Church, where the conven- 
tion opened at 3 o'clock with General 
Jas. A. Beaver presiding. 

Dr. W. E. Matthews, president of the 
local association, made the address of 
welcome. He briefly welcomed this as- 
semblage of Y. M. C. A. representatives 
to their city, stating that their presence 
was an honor to any city. 

Gen. James A. Beaver, of Bellefonte, 
then rose in response to the address of 
welcome and delivered an eloquent ad- 
dress on the Y. M. C. A. and this city i» 
general. He said J ohnstown is now a new 
city, with magnificent resources and unlim- 
ited facilities, enjoying all the blessings- <>' 
a Christian community. He then gave the 
delegates present some excellent advice, 
briefly outlining the benefits of associa- 
tion work. His address was an excelled 
one and was appreciated by all present. 

The evening session was devoted to tfl 
encouragement of the year's work and W 
hopeful outlook for the coming year, i°' 
lowed by a talk by Rev. R. A. Torre}; 
Superintendent of Moody's Bible l^T 
tute, of Chicago, on " How to win yo uD = 
men for Christ." The day sessions o 
Friday were taken up with the discussio 
pertaining to town and city associati 
work. e 

In the evening Rev. R. A. Torrey g» 
his address on the Holy Spirit, *W 
made a deep impression on the ^ ^ 
convention; this was followed by a J (r . 
on Extension Work, by Rev. S. A- ^ 
gart. Saturday morning was dev 



THE COLLEGE 10BUM. 



139 



tters of this year's work and especially 
railroad department. 

In the afternoon we were favored with 
two most excellent papers. " What are 
the special phases needing more attention 
in our efforts among young men in our 
Colleges ?" by Chas. H. Cookman, of 
Haverford College. This subject was 
treated from a practical standpoint by an 
earnest Christian worker and will doubt- 
less result in much good throughout the 
whole year. 

The other paper was " On what lines 
should we put forth most effort among 
young men engaged in mechanical and 
manufacturing pursuits," by Joseph M. 
Huston, of Philadelphia. 

This session was followed by an infor- 
mal but impressive conference of the Col- 
lege students. In the evening from five 
to seven o'clock a banquet was held for 
the delegates by the Ladies' Auxiliary of 
the Johnstown Association ; this was en- 
joyed by all, and each one expressed his 
appreciation of the kindness of the ladies 
by his happy countenance. This was fol- 
lowed by the Jubilee Meeting, which 
was an account of the fiftieth anniversary 
of the Y. M. C. A. held in London last 
June by delegates who were present. 

The consecration service on Sunday 
morning was very impressive, and each 
one was made to feel the need of the 
Holy Spirit in his own life. Delegates 
had charge of all the church services both 
morning and evening, and at 8:30 o'clock 
Sunday evening the farewell services were 
held. Now came the most impressive ser- 
vices of all when our beloved State Secre- 
tary, Chas. E. Hurlburt. made his last re- 
marks to an assembled convention previous 
to his resignation of the work Jan. 1, 1895. 
He will enter the work of Evangelistic 
Bible Training. In the closing hour there 
^as true fellowship manifested in the 
hymns, « God be with you till we meet 
a g a w," and " We'll never say good-bye," 
an d finally, with joined hands, 350 dele- 
gates sang " Blest be the tie that binds," 
ai jd the convention was declared closed. 
n ^ year texts were " Continue in prayer." 
t ° l 4: 2 ; and, " Quench not the Spirit " 
~-{Thess. 5:19. 

Resides the Sunday afternoon men's 
eetvng there were evangelistic meetings 
eia every night at 9 , dock in the Asso . 

'ation hall, and also in the Cambria Iron 
orks every day at noon. 
bout twenty-five professed conversion, 



and the meetings continued after the close 
of the convention. 

I. E. Albert, 
J. H. Maysilles, 

Delegates. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



Since our last report Messrs. W. H. 
Hertzog, of Shamokin, and Galon D. 
Light, of Jonestown, have joined our 
number. 

But not only is there an increase of 
members, but each succeeding session ex- 
ceeds the former in interest, preparation 
and instructiveness. It is indeed a veri- 
table pleasure to be on the u off division " 
with nothing to do, but listen to the exer- 
cises. The number of new ideas and 
practiced thoughts expressed during a 
single evening, together with their in- 
trinsic worth and oftimes eloquent appli- 
cation, is something remarkable. 

The new library room is about com- 
pleted. Our members deserve credit for 
the evolution of the plan, as well as for its 
accomplishment. Two months ago there 
was an apartment stored full of uncouth- 
ness, both animate and inanimate ; now it 
offers a pleasant and comfortable retreat 
for the student, where, surrounded by the 
master-minds of the ages, he may drink at 
the fountain of knowledge. 

The public program was a decided suc- 
cess. A large audience, interested and 
appreciative, aroused the participants to 
action worthy of themselves and their 
Society. The well-rendered recitations, 
eloquent orations, spirited debate, and 
harmonious songs all united to make the 
affair a most enjoyable one. Many words 
of appreciation have come to us from all 
sides, and we take this opportunity in be- 
half of the Society to thank our friends 
for their kind interest in our welfare. 

Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma Non Sine Pulvere. 



The work during the past month has 
has again proved the efforts put forth by 
the individual members. 

We have revived the custom of past 
years, by holding our meetings every week 
instead of every two weeks. 



140 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Our membership having been incaeased 
during the term, we found it possible to 
hold the meetings weekly and not place 
the members to any disadvantage. 

Benjamin Peters visited the society on 
the 19th ult. We invite our friend again, 
and also others who may wish to do so. 
We are always glad to see our friends 
come and visit us. 

John D. Stehman visited friends at 
Mountville on the 2tth ult. and reports 
having had a good time. 

Howard Enders was surprised by the 
unexpected visit of his mother on the 2d 
inst. 

Leslie Enders visited friends at Bunker 
Hill on the 20th ult. 

David Buddinger filled the pulpit of 
Rev. G. Meyer at Avon on the evening of 
the 21st ult. 



Clionian Literary Society. 

Virtute et Fide. 



Several meetings of the Society were 
omitted during October and November, 
owing to the Chestnut Picnic, the Public 
Meeting of the P. L. S , and the concert 
by the Sweedish Ladies' Quartet, but we 
feel that nothing has been lost for the 
entertainments were sources of instruction 
as well as enjoyment. 

The Misses Stehman, Bender and Klein- 
dinst spent from the 20th to 22d at their 
respective homes. 

M iss Fetrow enjoyed a visit to some 
friends, at Lebanon, the 21st of October 

Miss Bertha Mumma paid a last visit to 
her home at Hummelstown, October 28th, 
preparatory to her parents moving to 
Annville. 

The Society is busily engaged at 
present, making preparations for their 
Anniversary, which promises to be of 
more than usual interest. 



Exchanges. 



College Life begins its new volume in 
the form of a college magazine. Its new 
issue is a great improvement over former 
ones. Congratulations to its new edi- 
torial board. 



We have just received the initial nm 
bers of the High School Record, Cantc 
Ohio, and The Tiltonian, Tilton, N. jj 
For new papers their make-up is mos( 
creditable. May prosperity attend yon 
in your onward march as amateur j u r . 
nals. 

Squibs comes to us this month with a 
charming new cover. The contents of the 
paper are still up to their usual high stan- 
dard of excellence. Its editorials give 
evidence of much careful research. 

The Quincy Golden Rod has reached os 
with its special dedication number. The 
outer adornment is very dainty. A mag- 
nificent dedicatory poem tends to improve 
its literary contents. 

Many of our exchanges have celebrated 
the new year by making free use of the 
designer's art, and new covers seem to be 
the style. All of these papers are to be 
commended upon their enterprise, but Tht 
Muhlenberg deserves special mention, its 
new appearance being a decided improve- 
ment over its old. 

We are pleased to welcome The Mirror 
from the " City of Brotherly Love." It 
is a magnificent journal in all its depart- 
ments. Its chief features are the serial 
story, " Cloudland," and its tmique head- 
pieces. 

The following new unmentioned ex- 
changes, to which we extend a cordial 
invitation to come again, have been 
received the past month: The Dickw- 
sonian, University Courant, Old Hugh® 
Hope College Anchor, Cooper Courier, 
Gates Index, The Echo, Camden, N. 
Panorama, Providence, R. I. 

Our old exchanges coming for the first 
time this year are: B. F. H. S. Orach 
College Student, Buffalo H. S. Calendar, 
ML St. Joseph Collegian, H. S. Advance, 
Glen Falls Quarterly, Oak, Lily and 
Bucknell Mirror, Academic Observer, 
H. S. Idea, Western Maryland ColW 
Monthly, Philosophian Review, Midlam 
H. S. Amateur, Amitonian, Stranger* 
Chauncey Hall Abstract, Ursinus Bullet^' 
Vermont Academy Life, Otterbein Aeffi 
Wedge, Detroit Argus, H S. Record 
Anderson H. S. Journal, MuhlenWb 
Dial, Institute Record, Chelsea Beacon 
Pioneer, Cascadillian and H. S. Star. 

" The habit of making disparaging 
marks about one's College and its ^ 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



141 



•ency i S one that ought to be frowned 
down speedily. Strangers sometimes 
hear remarks which leave a totally wrong 
• ression f the institution under con- 
sideration. It is partially thoughtless- 
it i s partially for appearance sake, but 
whatever the cause, it is utterly wrong 
and hurtful. A child who would be guilty 
of holding his parents up to a critical 
survey is unworthy. And so a child of 
the College who indulges in such dispar- 
aging criticisms in the presence of out- 
siders who are not in a position to judge 
the matter, is likewise untrue to his alma 
mater's best interests. He cannot hope 
to right wrongs by such a method; he 
should not forget that he may do great 
harm, and turn away from her classic halls 
sons who might have been an honor to 
her. Why not speak well of the College, 
as we are taught to do of persons, always 
presenting the strong side, and, if there 
are weak places, attempt by the use of 
proper means to strengthen these. — Col- 
lege Mercury. 



Personals. 



"October Days" are past. 
Welcome, November. 

Prof. Lehman is learning to ride a 
bicycle. 

Miss Lizzie Shirk, of Middletown, was 
the guest of Miss McNair, over Sunday 
the 4th inst. 

Mr. Charles Sleichter and Mr. Reber 
spent the 4th at their homes at Scotland 
a nd Middle Spring, respectively. 

_Rev. Boyer preached in Lebanon Mis- 
sion Church, Sunday eve, 28th ult., and 
ftev. Allen Baer at Avon, on the 4th inst. 

Mr. Beatty was at his home in York, 
"•omthe 12th to the 16th ult. 



•"> Fetrow spent Sunday, the 14th 
uit -, at her home in Middletown. 

Mr. Runkle also enjoyed a pleasant 
!sit to his home in Harrisburg. 

Hoy visited I. G. Hoerner, Prog- 
ess > Pa., on the 21st ult. 

on^ivP" ^ght, of Jonestown, matriculated 
stud ^°nday the 21st ult., as a junior 



Re 



of the College. 



sr ,v - I. H. Albright and A. H. Rice 

tho o<S tlle College on business, Friday 
* ib th ult. 



Messrs. Hoy and Deibler attended a 
wedding in Steelton, on the evening of 
the 25th ult. 

Prof. Deaner's mother and his sister, 
Mrs. Jennie Neikirk, of Keedysville, 
Md., visited him several days during the 
latter part of October. They made a 
pleasant trip on Monday, the 29th, to Mt. 
Gretna, that being his mother's seven- 
tieth birthday. Although she has reached 
this ripe age, she is still hearty and vigor- 
ous. 

President (to the Swedish ladies), "Are 
you the ladies who sang at the College 
ten years ago ? 

Swedish ladies, " No, sir, we're not as 
old as that would indicate." 

The Philokosmian entertainment was 
well attended. 

The boys are amusing themselves by 
burning the leaves as they fall on the 
campus. 

A " whisker club " has been formed by 
a number of the boys to promote the 
growth of their beards." They have vowed 
not to shave or be shaved until a time 
agreed upon by them. Penalty : a duck- 
ing under the hydrant. Time will test 
their individual resources. 

Rev. J. P. Cowling, of Shamokin, 
recently appointed presiding Elder of 
Ontario conference, Can., visited the 
College the 16th ult., and brought with 
him a new student, Mr. W. F. Hertzog. 

The boarding students enjoyed a taffy 
party at the home of Rev. C. J. Kephart 
on Hallowe'en. 

The governing authority of the Class of 
'98 is vested in the following officers: 
President, Jacob Zerbe ; Secretary, 
Blanche Kephart, and Treasurer, Harvey 
Rankle. 

Some of the boys had planned to have 
a " big time " on Hallowe'en, but their 
plans were thwarted by the vigilance of 
the President. He believed " eternal 
vigilance to be the price of safety." 

On Saturday evening, November 3d, Di- 
vision No. 1, of Prof. Deaner's Rhetorical 
class gave the first public Rhetorical of 
the year in the College chapel. A large 
and appreciative audience was present. 
Both the literary and musical perform- 
ances were rendered with credit. 



142 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



A few students attended the temper- 
ance lecture given by Rev. C. J. Kephart 
in the U. B. Church on the evening of 
the 1st. His forcible arguments have in- 
duced some to vote the Prohibition ticket. 

On Friday afternoon, October 26th, at 
four o'clock, the first recital of the year was 
tendered the faculty, students and friends 
by the musical students of the College. 
The following interesting program was 
rendered : 

Rondo in A, Hay den. 

Miss Black. 

La Chatelaine-Fantaisie, Le Due. 

Miss Ruth Mumma. 
Lenora-Il Trovatore, Song, Verdi. 

Miss Stehman. 

Scarf Dance, Chaminade. 

Miss Klinedinst. 
II Trovatore, ..E. Dorn, Op. 39, No. 3. 

Miss Bender. 
Impromptu, Schubert. 

Miss Stehman. 

Spinning Song, Mendelssohn. 

Miss May Light. 
There, Little Girl, Don't Cry, .Song. Schaecker. 

Miss Kreider. 
Two Waltzes, Chopin. 

Mr. Hershey. 

All the numbers were executed with 
creditable skill, especially the selection 
by Mr. Hershey, which elicited much ap- 
plause. 

The Glee Club, under the leadership of 
Prof. Lehman meets twice a week, and 
gave its first public performance at the 
the Senior Rhetorical, Saturday eve, 10th 
inst. 

On Friday evening, November 2d, the 
friends and students of the College lis- 
tened with unbounded delight to the 
songs of the Swedish Ladies' Quartette 
and the humorous and dramatic recita- 
tions of Miss Weber ; the former full of 
bewitching harmon}*, affording not only 
enjoj^ment for the passing hour, but 
awaking echoes within our hearts which 
will continue to vibrate as long as we re- 
member the folk song of our own land 
and love the beautiful and true of all 
lands ; the latter with spirited and well 
chosen selections added not a little of 
fascination to the evening's entertainment. 
Upon the whole, words of praise are 
heard from all hearts. Undoubtedly the 
Swedish Ladies' Quartette has here gained 
a number of earnest admirers whose 
desire it is to hear this company again. 



It is better to adorn the mind than the 
face. 



Maori Shorthand. 

A system of shorthand specially apnjj. 
cable to the Maori language is said to 
have been invented by a schoolmaster of 
Canterbury, New Zealand. The system 
has already been successfully taught to 
numbers of Maori children in various 
native schools, the youngsters taking j 
up with keen interest and avidity. It jj 
said that the Maori language lends itself 
very readily to shorthand, as there art 
only about 14 letters in the alphabet. 

Why Not Make Pictures ? . . . . 



WHEN, WITH THE 



Preraa Camera, 




Success is so Certain that 
GUARANTEE IT, and you can di 
the Work Yourself. 

Prices, 4x5 Size, $12 to $3g; 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 



Rochester Optica 



ROCHESTER, N. Y- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



143 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY" RAILROAD. 
^ TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Trains. 



Lv Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

• Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

» Cbambersburg .. 

» Shippensburg 

» Newville 

" Carlisle 

» Mecbauicsburg.. 

Ar. Dillsburg 

« Harrisburg 



Mr'gl Day | Ev'g I N'gt 
Mail Exp I Mail | Exp 



No.12 No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 No. 8 No. 10 



C'bg 
Acc. 



Ky'e 
Exp 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore — 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 
A. M. 



A. M. 

6 15 

7 00 

7 40 

8 09 
8 30 

8 55 

9 15 
S40 

10 04 



A. M. P. M. 



11 25 

11 48 

12 08 
12 30 
12 50 

1 15 
1 40 



P. M. 

2 30 

3 20 

4 10 

4 30 

s oo 

5 30 

5 51 

6 17 
6 43 



P. M. 

3 20 

4 50 

7 10 
736 

8 00 
8 16 

8 53 

9 20 
9 43 

10 05 

A. M. 

4 30 
7 33 
6 20 

AM. 

Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stoppi' g at sdl intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cbam- 
bersburg. 



10 25 

1 25 
4 03 
3 10 



1 25 
4 03 
3 10 



6 50 
9 38 
6 45 



P. M. ! P. M. | P. M. 



7 05 

11 15 

3 50 
10 40 

P. M. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newville 

" Shippensburg.... 
" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp. 


No. 1 No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 


No. 17 


No. 9 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


1140 


445 


8 53 


11 20 


2 15 


4 23 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


1150 


2 20 


4 30 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M, 


4 40 


753 


12 40 


3 40 


5 20 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


103 


4 01 


5 41 


8 20 


5 30 


8 36 


129 


4 25 


6 05 


8 44 


5 55 


9 00 


152 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


5 10 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


535 


7 20 


9 50 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 50 




10 12 


7 25 


10 27 


325 


6 18 




10 35 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 






11 00 


12 00 




7 50 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



W. F. BECKER. 



J. P. BRCGGER. 



Additional trains wil leave H arrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. )0:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
|i:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
train will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 
a - m ;; stopping at all i termediate stations. 

Pullman 1'alaceSleepingCars between Hagerstownand New 
iork on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 

p m Ji 8 Ex Press and New Orleans Express w. St. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
f£Pi!!i^etweenj>hiladelphia and N>-w Orleans. 

U you wish to advertise anything anywhere at anytime, 
w r i te }° GE0 - P- ROWELL&Co., No. 10 Spruoe Street, 

■EVERY one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
*•< vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Hook for 
A* vertisers, » 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
'< m ,on receiptor price. Contains a careful compilation from 
a,.,, American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
ai l journals; gives the circulation ratine of every one, 
nprto- g .' oa <leal of information about rates and other matters 
V, t Ji 111 '? t0 th e business of advertising. Address KOW- 
York EKTISIN(i HUKEAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 

Rensselaer \ 
Polytechnsc^/\ 
Institute, 



f 4 



^0, 



-^>>* THE ^-<<— 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS A XT) STATIONERY. 

Special Kates to Students. 

W Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOK PRICES. 



H. A. LOSER, 

GROCERIES AND CONFECTIONERY, 

OYSTERS AND ICE CREAM, 

AXNVILLE, FA. 

jg B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34- East Main Street, 

ANNVILLH, PA 

isaacmanm¥n, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, T*A. 

T HE B£ST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 

T R. McCAULY, 

-' daily meat market. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRIC ES. AtTNVIIiLE. FA. 

JOHN TRUMP, 

J BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



K Troy, N.Y. 

~-~j*°^e xamination8 provi ded for. Send for a Catalogue. 

Re A 1SKILLIANT STUDENT. 

envXjh tne c ' as8 < perfect recitations, and examinations, 
es sarv 10 attain uch honor a good memory is nec- 

I'OKATi^r nevv Phv iologlcal discovery— MEMORY KES- 
theoTpm TABLE I s quickly and permanently incense 
Power u-l two t0 ten-fold and greatly augment intellectual 
marveloi cult 8tu dies, lectures, etc., easily mastered ; truly 
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" Postpaid. Send for circular. 

MEMORY TABLET CO., 114 5th Ave., N. Y. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
DEALER IK 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Main St., Annville, Pa. 



, cMEAT^TRADEMARKs^ 

COPYRIGHTS, 

CAN I OBTAIN A PATENT? For a 
prompt answer and an honest oomion write to 
IUUNN & CO., who have had nearly fifty years 4 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A H an dboo k of In- 
formation concerning Patents and how to > OD- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue Of mechan- 
ical and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Muim & CO. receive 
special notice in the Scientific Amenrleav, and 
thus are brought widely Before the > ^bWcwrth- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper 
issued weekly, elegantly illustrated, baa by far the 
;°°_.Zi.™^S2Siii»r: o^iontiqc work in ihf. 

i sent free. 



iargest"<ffi53lation Of any SCientidC WOTJt In the 
wor'd. US ft year. Sample copies sent free. 

Bidding Edit i. m, monthly, fl50 a year. Single 
copies, ii« cents. Every number contams beau- 
ti/m plates, in jc'.ors. and photm-aplis of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to snow the 
latest designs and secure! contracts. AddreU 
MUNN & CO., NEW YORK. 3bl Bkoadwax 



144 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SHA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annvllle, Pa. 

ADA'M B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE, PA 



J 



ACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 30 Main St., Annville, Pa. 



D' 



|R Y GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

— AND — 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTING, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 

HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Ann vilte, Pa 
H. H. KKEIDER. JNO. E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

ANNVILLK, PA. 

ILVL. II. 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and^ Entertainments Supplied with OYS 
A1V1\I¥ILLE, PA, 



TICKS AND CKKAM. 



S. M. SHENK'S BAKERY, 



HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 



FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Henn'a Houses, Ann v) He. 

— Headquarters i or — 
GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Restaurant Attached. Meals at AH Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



if yon want to Bny a Hat risbt, and a ngnt Hat, or anytime 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT & Co., 
Eighth and Cumberland Sts., Lebanon, Pt, 

en]g 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U. B. MUTUAL AID 80CIETI 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.n0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets , $146,809.9* 

Contingent Assets H 6 , 970 ™ 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.* 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN. 

Thepayment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, ^ 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death ol » 
member insured lor $1000, Is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


ASS'MT 


Age. 


ASS'MT 


Age. 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


50 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


92 


51 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


52 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


53 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


54 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 01) 


55 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


56 


27 
28 
29 


72 
73 
74 


37 
38 
39 


87 
88 
89 


47 
48 
49 


1 12 
1 18 
1 24 







13» 

1 40 
150 

1 L 
170 

|§ 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of * 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary," 11 
ever suoh death may oc»ur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, I* 



tune VII. Number 10. 

THE 



College Foruji. 



DECEMBER, 1894. 



• + CONTENTS : + • 



PAGE 

December, 145 

^ oman in History 145-147 

Tw » "Isms," 147-149 

J™"gles, 149,150 

*<%ism, 150,151 

Y dltorials > 152,153 

f Wl C - A - State Convention, 153,154 

10 Foreign Lands, 154 



PASS 

Philokosmian Literary Society........ 154,155 

Kalozetean Literary Society, 155 

Clionian Literary Society, 155 

Clionian Anniversary, 156 

Personals, 157,158 

Exchanges,. 158 

Advertisements, 158-160 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
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4 



THE COLLEGE EOKUM. 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VII. No. 10. ANNVILLE, PA., DECEMBER, 1894. Whole No. 76. 



December. 



At Nature's great hall-door there stands 

An usher maid, a roseate girl, 
With figure robed in snowy bands 

And head adorned with icy pearl. 

Around her feet in showers fall 
A myriad joys of Christmas-tide, 

And she reveals her love for all 
With ne'er the semblance of a chide. 

The zephyrs laugh and softly flute 
In siren tunes of guileless love ; 

But she in scorn doth hear their suit, 
To revel with the saints above. 

Fore'er her heart is truly glad, 
And bright her face in radiant glow 

At thought that she farewell must bade 
But once a world of sinful woe. 

And when her life-bell last doth chime 

Its silver-toned harmonic lay. 
In sweet content she bows to Time, 

And ushers in a New Year's Day. 

N. COLESTOCK SCHLICHTER, '97. 



Woman in History. 



MARY M. SHENK, B. S. 
(Oration delivered at the Clionian Anniversary.) 
lh e greatness of a nation is but the 
greatness of its individual members. 
, 0Se for ces which have been the most 
L nt llay e not always been apparent to 



casual observer, and even at times 



the 

Hot f u ~ auu even a,ii nines 

in* ti° i 6 8tudent of history. In study- 
nati r lstor y of nations we find that no 
*om . ecame great which held their 
ivomnV 11 sub j e ction or did not honor 
WhUe ' ° n the contrary, the 
ni 2ed na "ons were those which recog- 
m eiub Woman as one of its individual 
m erit „ ei8 ' witl1 capabilities and endow- 

*oman' equal . • to tll0Se of man - That 
axiom J- abil 'ty is equal to man's is 

0ur d "c, hence it needs no proof, 
a f ew ? l \ r P° 8 e is to briefly speak of 
her achievements and the part 



she has taken in bettering humanity, so 
that what she has done may be an in- 
spiration to each one of the members of 
the society. Every nation owes much to 
its women. In proportion to the ad- 
vancement of woman has been the pro- 
gress of a nation. Culture is a fundamental 
necessity in the development of the human 
race. Woman, as a member, must have 
that culture to successfully do her part. 
She is not to prepare to take man's work, 
but to do her own well. Her sphere of 
work is not limited. A few years ago 
there were but few professions which 
were available to her, but that day has 
passed and to-day she stands on the same 
level as man. The doors which were 
closed to her have, by her perseverance, 
been opened wide. Her increased op- 
portunities have brought greater respon- 
sibilities upon each one of us. 

In the past what has woman done ? 
What factor has she been in the history 
of nations ? Our nation owes its liberty 
to our foremothers as well as to the fore- 
fathers of our country. Seven months 
before the Declaration of Independence 
was written and signed, which declared to 
us our liberty, a similar declaration was 
"written and signed by a woman, Abigail 
Adams. In a letter to her husband she 
places before him the necessity of imme- 
diate action. What grander example of 
bravery and self-possession in time of 
national bravery did we have than that of 
Mollie Pitcher, who fired the cannon dur- 
in the battle in which her husband was 
killed, or Joan of Arc. who at the head of 
an army repulsed the enemy and reseated 
a king upon his throne ? 

Woman's work in the Church has been 
noble and great. What work could have 
been grander than that of pleading for the 
life of Christ, and what she has done has 
been very beautifully told us by Eton 
Barret. 



146 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



"Not she with traitorous kiss the Saviour 
stung, 

Not she denied him with unholy tongue ; 
She, when apostles shrank, did dangers 
brave, 

Last at his cross and earliest at his grave." 

Woman stands foremost in our Master's 
work to-day. The Church is full of 
women for the same reason that our 
prisons are empty. Woman's mind and 
heart are purer than man's, hence less 
prone to wander away. She is in direct 
S3'mpathy with the underlying principles 
of Christianity. 

In literature woman is man's peer 
She has given the world books which 
will never be forgotten. Deborah was the 
composer of the triumphal ode of which 
Milman says : " Lyric poetry has nothing 
in any language which can surpass the 
boldness and animation of this song." 
Beside its lyrical value it possesses great 
historical merit. It is said of Scott that 
when he turned from poetiy to novel 
writing it was with the fear of being sur- 
passed by Maria Edgeworth, who was one 
of the most popular writers in the early 
part of the 19th century. This age was 
prolific in woman novelists. Mrs. Hem- 
ans has written for us " The Landing of 
the Pilgrim Father's," and nothing finer 
has been produced on the subject. Others 
are Jean Ingelow and Mrs. Browning. 
Of the four novelists who gained promi- 
nence in the early part of the century 
two were women, Charlotte Bronte and 
Georg Eliot in England. In America 
no novel was so popular or productive of 
so much good as " Uncle Tom's Cabin." 
Without it the North would never have 
had a real conception of the woes of 
slavery. 

In art woman competes with man for 
supremacy. Germany produced the first 
woman sculptor. By her perseverance 
and patience Rosa Bonheur has achieved 
greatness, and to-day she stands first 
among the animal painters in the world. 

In science a Mitchell and a Clarke, who, 
with vision as acute as that of man, tell 
us of the wonders of the skies. 

In statesmanship Queen Elizabeth, 
Queen Victoria and others were the heads 
of their government, not only in name, 
but in reality. What monarch was ever 
held in such great esteem as good Queen 
Elizabeth or England's Queen of to-day. 
None showed greater knowledge of govern- 
ment and wonderful diplomac}^. 

In politics Susan Anthony, Belva 



Lockwood, Francis Willard, might be re. 
ferred to. 

How sneeringly has it often been asked 
can women invent ? 
"Whatever strong armed man hath wrought 
Whatever he has done, 
That goal hath woman also reached ; 

That action hath she done." 
The invention of the cotton gin, which 
so aided in revolutionizing the industrial 
world, was by a woman ; how many per. 
sons either know of the fact or credit her 
for it? Often her inventions have been 
patented under man's name and the credit 
given to him. 

In every department which she has 
entered, in oratory, law, philanthoph|,| 
educators, physicians, journalists, her 
labors have been productive of as great 
results as those of her brothers. 

In the spheres referred to her work is 
on an equality with man's, but she has 
one sphere, the home, where she shines 
alone in her glory, and there her work has 
been most potent. We boast of man's 
greatness, but when we seek the causes 
the great men themselves tell us it W 
due to their mothers. Her achievments 
may not be known to many, much of 
what she has achieved has been done un- 
ostentatiously, silently she has moulded 
our character by her example and precept 
Great will be the number whose names 
never appear upon the role of honor, m 
thousands will call them blessed, because 
of the joy they have brought into then 
lives. Comtek a French philosophy 
says, " The moral amelioration of 
constitutes the chief mission of won* 
What higher sphere, what broader m 
what diviner mission could she seek*: 
" One of the most eminent of Engl'*; 
critics, in noticing the President's mm 
at the dedication of a monument to G*l 
Washington, alludes most Deaut ^ Si 
the influence of the unnoticed and f gj 
tinguished millions of mothers, sis | 
wives and daughters who w ^ u0U **'j^ 
the clamor of the strong minded an<^ | 
voiced sisterhood for ' equal rigbf '» | 
had the higher privilege of knoWii^ 
immeasur able and ineffable in flliellC J f t t< 
exercised in shaping the destinies 
world through those whom it has o 
as masters." * $ 

To you, the active members 01 
Society, a few inferences will be gj 
which, we trust, will enable you to^ | 



your true position in society 



world. Soon you will be in 



active 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



147 



your day dreams will have given place to 
realities. What you will be depends on 
what you do and are now. By living up 
to your motto, " Virtue et Fide," great 
things will be expected of you. Neglect- 
ing your opportunities } r ou will be, at 
most, mediocres. Your privileges bring 
with them responsibilities which you 
must nobly meet. 

Will you, who are living in the greatest 
age the world has ever seen, when woman's 
opportunities were never greater, will you 
disgrace woman in history, or will you be 
worthy daughters of this generation? The 
women greatest in history are those who 
never sacrificed their womanly nature. 
You, to become eminent, need not become 
manly or unsex yourselves. Always be a 
woman and be womanly. Woman has 
been the great moral conservator of the 
world. You, to have the greatest in- 
fluence, must live and act your Chris- 
tianity. Your lives are to be blameless. 

So often we look with indifference upon 
our every day duties, they are so common 
place. If only our spheres of work was 
widened we forget that — 
"In small proportions we just beauties see, 

And in small measures lines may perfect be." 

Great duties are only accomplished by 
doing well the small ones. 

You rejoice at what you have achieved 
as a society in the past. 

If your future achievements are to 
exceed those of the past, greater and more 
united must be your efforts and your aims 
at the highest scholarship. 



Two "Isms." 

' Hand in hand, with wandering step 
a «a slow, thro' Eden took their solitary 
™y« ' These are the suggestive words 
f the closing lines of Milton's " Paradise 
Lost." 

W°i day " hand in ha nd," are linked 
in^A S reat ev ^ s tn at are degrad- 

3 American politics and may finally 

^ the . overthrow of our Govern- 
h viz.: Bo'odleism and Romanism, 
the 01 T° Ue hundred and eighteen years 
coh " 6 sent iment expressed in Lin- 
u 18 prayer at Gettysburg, that we are 
p eo government of the people, for the 
b 0a L and bv the people," has been the 

But a cI ^ Ust pride of our countr y- 

that 4*' ma y we not blush with shame 

rev ised haS been only to ° truthfull y 
c j that we are now a government of 



the boodler, for the boodler and by the 
boocller. 

Mr. Stead says that the American Re- 
public, altho' too strong to be in danger 
from without, is now learning that de- 
mocracies can breed tyrants, and that the 
conquerors of old who overran empires 
for the sake of plunder and impoverished 
whole nations to fill their treasuries have 
their legitimate heirs and successors in 
the coalesced plutocracy of the United 
States. 

To-day nine per cent, of our families 
own seventy-one per cent, of our sixty 
billions of wealth. Everywhere the money 
power has throttled the laborer. The 
poor man is the servant of the rich, and, 
indeed, is in danger of becoming his slave. 

" Each man for himself and the devil 
take the hindmost." seems to be a prevail- 
ing sentiment, and the vast majority are 
among the hindmost. 

Under a system in which " might makes 
right " there is no law save the will of the 
strong, and the poor and weak are driven 
to the wall. We have reached a period 
in which wealth subjugates everything; 
it gags the press ; it buys the legislature ; 
it corrupts judges, and even lays its filthy 
fingers on our churches and universities. 

"As a nation's God is, so will its laws 
be," and our Nation's God is the almighty 
dollar, and its laws are made to put the 
boodle in their makers' pockets. 

Our own representatives go to our 
legislative halls and sell their votes to 
corporations and tax dodgers for boodle. 
In the city of Chicago, sixty out of sixty- 
eight alderman — men of means — do not 
pay a single cent of tax. But we need 
not go beyond our own State or county, 
and perhaps not beyond the sound of my 
voice to find the ungodly tax dodger. 

Our polluted politics is in everything 
and is poisoning everything. Political 
bribery is such an open and common 
scandal that courts of justice almost con- 
sider it a tolerable virtue. Blocks of 
infamous houses in our large cities are 
allowed to run open by the payment of 
hush money to the officers of the law. 
Such evils are threatening the perpetuity 
of our free Republic. Dr. Parkhurst's 
work in New York, has revealed to the 
public one of the greatest scandals of 
modern times. The Breckenridge affair 
in Washington shocked the Christian 
sentiment of the Nation. Every depart- 
ment of municipal government is satu- 



148 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



rated with corruption. Justice is con- 
taminated and outraged in her very 
courts. In our political arena, virtue 
and ability for the most faithful service 
have no reward compared with the ascend- 
ancy of the spoils system. But boodleism 
will continue in the ascendancy until our 
pulpits are filled with fearless men like 
Dr. Parkhurst, and our public offices with 
men, instead of politicians, demagogues 
and bosses. We need men of principle 
and Christian integrity for our public 
trusts. But let us now consider the 
other evil — Romanism. Sampson was a 
man in Israel, mighty in strength, who 
overcame all his enemies, but by their 
cunning and trickerjr they found the 
secret of his strength to be in the seven 
locks of his unshaven hair. 

By and by they lulled him to sleep 
and cut his locks. Then the wicked 
harlot Delilah cried, " Awake, Samson, 
the Philistines are upon thee." He arose 
weak as other men and in the power of 
his mocking enemies. 

Like unto the seven locks of hair, we 
boast of our strength as a nation in that 
we have seven free institutions, viz : 
free thought, free speech, free worship, 
free press, free schools, free shops and a 
free ballot. These seven locks Romanism 
— " the mother of harlots " — through 
superstition, bigotry and trickery, is try- 
ing to sever from us, and unless we awake 
to the true situation she will succeed. 
Shall we remain in a state of lethargy and 
indifference while Romanism is actually 
at work lock by lock, severing our 
strength. Shall we await to hear the 
angel of God cry from the battlements of 
heaven, " Awake, America, thine enemy 
is upon thee ? " 

0, may America awake before its doom 
is sealed as Rome has sealed the fate of 
other nations, and may the descendants 
of those who bought us liberty with their 
blood now buy us freedom from foreign 
dominion in all our States and depart- 
ments of government with their ballots. 

Rome declares that nationalities must 
be subordinate to religion ; that we must 
learn that we are Romanists first and 
citizens next; and that the will of the 
Pope is the supreme law in all lands. 

A. Romish priest of Chicago has said 
that the time is not far distant when the 
Roman Catholics of the United States, at 
the order of the Pope, will refuse to pay 
their school tax and will send bullets to 



the breasts of the government's 
rather than pay it. 

Such declarations as these carried out 
mean death to our free institutions 



Let them be the tocsin of alarm to 



even- 



American citizen. The illustrious Lm 
coin once said : " Though not a prophet. 
I see a very dark cloud on our horizon, 
and that dark cloud is coming from 
Rome." That prophetic cloud of Lin- 
coln's has ripened into an awful reality, 
and now it looms up before us in over- 
whelming blackness. In Chicago from 
the Mayor down over two-thirds of the 
public office are filled by Romanists. Of 
the three Judges in the Court of Appeals 
at Washington two are Catholics and the 
other of a Catholic family. 

In the present National administrate 
one must almost invariably be a Roman 
Catholic to secure a position in am 
government department, and if in office 
a refusal to contribute to the Sisters of 
Charity means almost immediate removal, 

The Romanists have control of the 
Bureau of Indian Missions and haveap 
propriated millions of dollars of public 
money to Catholic Missions, and still have 
access to the treasury vaults. 

They are the sworn enemies of oar 
public schools — our public schools which 
have developed a Lincoln, a Garfield and 
a Carter Harrison. Out of their parochial 
schools have cornea Booth, a Guiteaua^ 
a Prendergast to assassinate these men. 
In a single state in South America, where 
Rome has ruled for three centuries, one 
citizen in ten is a monk, a priest or a nM 
and seventy per cent, of the children are 
illegitimate ; but one newspaper is W 
lished, and that by the government. "J 
do not need the emissaries of that sly 
Dago on the bank of the Tiber to tell 
how to run our government or educ* 
our children. j 

Let us ever remember that "^ ern ^ 
vigilence is the price of liberty, a 
awake from this spirit of indifference; » 
us give up our selfishness and stop c " aS ^ 
the almighty dollar as long as we 
drifting towards the most terrible cllB 
that any country has ever known. j 

The present political situation, ^ e ° c ^\ 
depression in business, and the i e ^ (t 
strikes, all serve to emphasize the < 
that we need better men at the p ea j, 
our Government and State affair 8, ^ 
this once fair land, for which our . 
fathers freely shed their blood and 




1 



e g re 

-•J 

L eart 
rs. 



H 
fore- 



COLLEGE FOR U3L 



149 



ficed their lives, to be dragged deeper and 
deeper into the mire of pulluted American 
olitics? Is it to continue to be the 
dumping ground for all nations, and shall 
it in another century be enwrapped in the 
glim y coils of that hydra-headed monster — 
Romanism ? Or shall this great country 
of ours be made the grandest nation under 
the sun, where the pure and undefiled 
o-ospel of Christ shall be preached in all 
its fullness and power ; where our rulers 
shall he Christian men ; where Socialism, 
Communism and Anarchism shall be 
known only in name; where American 
workingmen will be free from laboring 
besides paupers, criminals and the offcasts 
of other nations ; where the flames of 
patriotism shall be enkindled in the heart 
of every child by our beloved " Star 
Spangled Banner " floating over every 
school house? These questions let the 
Christian men of America answer by cast- 
ing a pure and unpolluted ballot, and de- 
manding a free and independent Church. 

J. H. Maysilles, '95. 



Triangles. 

Geometrically speaking, a triangle is a 
figure having three sides and three angles. 

A triangle is called, with reference to 
its sides, a scalene triangle when no two 
•of its sides are equal ; an isosceles trian- 
gle when two of its sides are equal ; an 
equilateral triangle when its three sides 
we equal. 

The lamp of a man's life has three 
wicks— blood, brain and breath; or his 
three natures — physical, mental and moral. 

We see a man, tall, well built and 
strong; we admire him ; but after coming 
! nto conversation with him we find noth- 
ln g that springs from a cultivated mind — 
nori e of the loftier sentiments which we 
Would expect from such a pleasing ex- 
er ior. Then again, in many the mental 
praties are equally developed with the 
Physical powers, but we still do not have 
^ highest condition that can be reached, 
y Un til the moral nature has been pol- 
fee? t0 SUcl1 an extent that those finer 
fleowP' tuose holier emotions, are re- 

' w do we find the maximum. 
i n ^i^se three natures are developed 
'thrpf ent Proportions we notice the 
aatur of trian g les - In the phy sic{l1 
the s 6 ^ eveio l )e( l above the rest we notice 
abo v C f, e 5 in the physical and mental 
' et he moral, the isoceles; but when the 



^oral 



as the physical and mental, then, and not 
until then, do we find the equilateral or 
perfect. 

If only the physical is developed can 
we call him a man, a man in the true 
sense of the word? Who would call 
Sullivan a man? We say "Down," to 
the very idea. 

In many of the great men of past ages 
the physical and mental are developed, 
but still not the true man. But the world 
need not be looking for the perfect man, 
for he has been in the world in the person 
of Christ Jesus, who through his servant 
has taught us these words : " And now 
abideth faith, hope and love, these three, 
but the greatest of these is love." 

These Christian graces form another 
triangle, but not perfect, for " the greatest 
of these is love." 

True grace is much more excellent than 
any spiritual gifts whatever, and faith, 
hope and love are the three principal 
graces, of which charity is the chief. 

Wisdom may dwell with love, and 
charity may be cautious. But it is apt to 
believe well of all, to entertain a good 
opinion of them when there is no appear- 
ance to the contrary ; nay, to believe well 
when there may be some dark appearances, 
if the evidences of ill be not clear. All 
charity is full of candor, apt to make the 
best of everything, and put on it the best 
face; it will judge well and believe well, 
as far as it can with any reason, and it will 
stretch its faith beyond appearances for 
the support of a kind opinion ; but it will 
go into a bad one with the utmost reluct- 
ance, and fence against it as much as it 
honestly can. And when, in spite of in- 
clination, it cannot believe well of others 
it will yet hope well. How lovely a thing 
would Christianity appear to the world if 
its diciples were more actuated and ani- 
mated by this divine principle ! 

Love is greater than faith and hope, be- 
cause the end is greater than the means. 
Faith fixes on the divine revelation and 
assents to that; hope fastens on future 
happiness and waits for that, and in 
heaven faith will be swallowed up in 
vision and hope in fruition. There is no 
room to believe and hope when we see 
and enjoy. 

From this triangle composed ot the 
Christian graces, of which love is the sum- 
mum bonum, we pass to perfect the tn- 



ls developed in the same proportion 



angle, the Godhead, or Trinity. 
What is this Trinity ? This has 



been 



150 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the subject of many discussions and in 
some respects is still a mystery to many. 
A noted speaker has given us this defi- 
nition. " The Father, Son and Holy 
Ghost are one and only one God. Each 
has a peculiarity incommunicable to the 
others. Each with the others is God." 

In God are not three wills, three con- 
sciences, three intellects, three sets of af- 
fections. The first of all the religious 
truths of exact research is that the Lord 
our God is one God. It is the immortal 
doctrine of the Christian ages that there 
are not three Gods, but one God. He is 
one substance, and in that one substance 
are three subsistences, but the subsis- 
tences are not individualities. The Trin- 
ity might be compared to a solar radiance. 
Heat, color and light subsist in the solar 
radiance. The three are one, but not in 
the 'same sense in which they are three. 
Each has a peculiarity incommunicable to 
the others. Neither is full solar radiance 
without the others. Each with the others 
is such solar radiance. Sunlight, rainbow, 
heat, are one solar radiance; Father, Son, 
Holy Ghost, one God. 

This is what we understand by the Trin- 
ity, and we will wait until the mists have 
rolled in splendor, when all mysteries 
shall be made clear. 

Ella N. Black, '96. 



Keel y ism. 



G. A. L. KINDT, A. B. 

Almost every day we learn of something 
we never knew before. Almost ever}' day 
we hear of some invention being perfected, 
and the American public, at least, is grad- 
ually coming to such a point where it will 
believe almost anything it sees or hears, 
especially if it be in a daily paper. There 
are some, however, who obstinately refuse 
to believe anything, unless they can di- 
rectly verify it. 

Between these two it is necessary to 
pursue a course of investigation and reason 
by which we may form our conclusions, 
be they right or wrong. When there is 
no possibility of direct investigation we 
must take the statements of capable men 
and must apply our own knowledge of the 
subject under our consideration ; this must 
be our method in this paper. 

The matter under discussion in this 
paper is the wonderful discoveries in re- 



gard to etheric vibration, said to hav& 
been made by Mr. J. W. Keely, of Phii a . 
delphia. 

This man has been and is yet working 
on a method of producing and practically 
applying a force which he calls " Symp a . 
thetic negative (or positive) polar attrac- 
tion," and which for all the purposes of 
this paper we will call " Sympathetie % 
bration" of ether. 

Let us first see whether there is any 
true foundation for this man's researches, 
Pythagoras says that " The same princi- 
ple underlies the harmonies of music and 
the motion of the heavenly bodies." The 
ancient philosopher probably did not re- 
alize the exact significance of his words, 
nevertheless there is much truth in what 
he said. 

In later times plrysicists had much 
difficulty in explaining different phe- 
nomena which they observed, so they 
used a hypothetical ether, gave it the 
requisite properties and were satisfied. 

It is a well-known fact that nature 
abhors a vacuum ; ether very nicely fills 
it up ; it also serves the purpose of con- 
veying magnetic and gravital attraction, 
though its most important use is the con- 
veying of light. As there are intermo- 
lecular and interatomic spaces, this ether 
must be all-pervading. 

But let us consider the evidence as to 
the existence of a force which bears more 
closely on the subject. No doubt maty 
have heard of the wandering musician- 
who threatened to fiddle down an iro» 
bridge, in process of construction, » 
who succeeded so well that the work^ 
bribed him to leave. This is not a W 
by any means ; or, rather, though tne 
story may be mythical, it is founded on» 
true scientific principle. An experifl>ej> 
in proof of this is given by Mr. Lascelie* 
Scott, an English scientist, one of 
friends succeeded in breaking a large 
tankard by singing the note correspond"' 
to its fundamental. We know that sottf 
has a well-defined influence in the ro atl 
ing of flowers and the hastening of s0 
chemical reaction. 

the 

What seems still more strange i , 
decomposition of some substances ^ 
strong light, such as chlorine water- 
has also been proven that light 
falling intermittently on a prepared , e j r 
produce sound. These things can su 
not be produced by the beating of at 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



151 



pheric waves, and physicists explain them 
by turning to ether. 

Keely thinks so too, but he has tried to 
utilize this force and use it practically. 
2ela's new way of lighting is somewhat 
similar in principle, and Prof. Hertz is 
working along the same line. Keely, how- 
ever is°using entirely new methods in his 
researches, and he evidently has faith in 
his final victory. 

He has hardly any scientific education 
and cannot express himself clearly, yet he 
has worked for twenty-two years, en- 
deavoring to solve the mysteries of etheric 
vibration. 

He hegan his researches as the inventor 
of an air-ship, and this has been his ulti- 
mate aim all this time. In a short time 
he seemingly fell on to this new idea and 
has been constructing new machinery and 
apparatus almost continually. 

His persistence is something remark- 
able. In the course of his experiments 
he has been laid up for weeks and months 
by braises and breaks. One of his friends 
tells us that there is not one bone in his 
hands that has not been broken. But, 
notwithstanding, he to-day advances many 
new principles, which seem ridiculous, 
but may be worth due consideration. 

Although some of his views have been 
advanced by other men, he has discovered 
them for himself. He has discovered that 
all forms of energy consist of triune vibra- 
tions, atomic, interatomic and molecular, 
and that the only difference between any 
forces consists in the vibration frequencies. 
He claims that the trio of vibrations of 
electrical force has never been and never 
be controlled, that only one of the 
tri o is in use, and that the three would 
destroy everything within reach. 

The vibrations producing sound are 
towest in frequency ; next come heat and 
an ^ light, and when the vibration fre- 
quency of sound is multiplied by many 
Millions he succeeds in obtaining what he 
calls the " Dominant" force. 

Keely goes so far beyond all accepted 
doctrines as to declare that he has suc- 
g p in disintegrating hydrogen gas. 

e las also discovered that the normal 
of ff ^ mo ^ ecu ^ ar vibration is one-third 
an • diameters, and that to produce 

} action they must be excited by chords 
Set to thirds. 

W S v Statec * before, many of his ideas 
tios - n a< ^ vancec * before his time, and 
e original discoveries, such as the 



disintegration of hydrogen, must not be 
accepted readity. The gentleman uses 
common scientific terms in such confusing 
ways that his meaning cannot always be 
clearly ascertained. 

The force Keely makes use of in his 
experiments is the "Dominant;" he pro- 
duces it by sounding a note on a musical 
instrument which corresponds to the 
fundamental of the substance employed. 
By the disintegration of water by his pro- 
cess he obtains the unheard-of pressure of 
twenty thousand (20,000) pounds to the 
square inch. When we compare this 
with one hundred and ten or twenty, as 
commonly employed in steam boilers, we 
can readily account for broken bones and 
the like. 

Keely makes no secret of his methods, 
and his laboratory is open for inspection ; 
he cannot be accused of scheming, for he 
gives evidence of believing just what he 
advocates. 

One reason for the rejection of his 
theory by maivy is his confusing way of stat- 
ing his meaning. Neither he nor his friends 
can express clearly just what they mean. 
Mrs. Moore has written ver}^ much on the 
subject, but we must wait awhile before 
we can see just what the aims of this man 
are. His delay in applying these forces 
of his is natural; he has only recently 
discovered anything of real value. Watt 
was twenty years in applying his steam 
power even in crude methods, and was 
just as greatly slandered and persecuted 
as Keely is at present. Recently some 
scientists visited the Philadelphia labora- 
tory and saw several experiments, such as 
suspending weights in glass jars, re- 
voving isolated spheres, crushing gold 
quartz and other similar feats performed 
simply by sounding different musical notes. 
The camera failed' to reveal any attempt 
at fraud. 

After careful study many men have de- 
cided in his favor and are anxiously wait- 
ing for further developments. We hope 
that all these years of patient labor may 
not go unrewarded and may perhaps soon 
see our steam engines and dynamos give 
way to piano strings and jew's-harps. 

Many teach that woman can never do 
her duty until she is recognized as the 
equal of man in citizenship. That she must 
possess and use the ballot if she hopes 
to exercise the permanent influence of a 
freeman among freemen. 



152 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



EDITORS. 



H. CLAY DEANEK, A. M., 
Editor-in-Chief and Publisher. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 

John H. Matsilles, '95. Ira E. Albert '97 

Walter G. Clipfinoer, '99. 

EXCHANGE EDITOR. 

Norman C. Schlichter, '97. 



ALUMM EDITOR. 
Prof. John E. Lehman, A. M., '74. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 

Clionian Society— Miss Mart Richards, '97. 
Philokosmian Society— W. Elmer Heilman. 
Kalozetean Society— Harry W. Mayer '95 



THK COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty.flve cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publisher. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



EfcitortaL 



A Merry Christmas and Happy New 
Year to all. 



We are glad to present to our readers 
in this issue a scientific article entitled 
" Keelyism," by G. A. L. Kindt, who was 
a member of the Class of '94, but is now 
taking post-graduate work in the Ohio Uni- 
versity, Athens, Ohio. 

The winter term of the College opens 
on January 7th. There are many young 
people who would like to attend but have 
not the means. They are asking for help, 
but none is forthcoming. Is the Church 
doing right by not providing for the 
education of her worthy own ? Does not 
this neglect lose many to the Church? 
Upon whom does the responsibility rest? 



With this issue closes Vol. VI. of The 
College Forum. We have improved it 
at an additional expense without increas- 
ing its price. The many kind words of 
commendation received from time to time 
from our subscribers have been appre- 
ciated. Many subscriptions expire with 
this issue; we would like to retain your 
subscription, which we trust you will re- 



new as soon as you read our earnest re. 
quest. Twenty-five cents is not much to 
each one of you; but to us it means life 
or death. Kindly recommend The Forum 
to your friends, and send us a Christmas 
greeting in the form of a club. We will 
appreciate all you may do. 



Parents are deciding upon some suit, 
able present for their sons and daughters. 
It may be a horse and buggy, a gold 
watch, a musical instrument, books or 
bric-a-brac. Any of the above would be 
very nice and acceptable, but is there not 
something else that will be of more real 
worth than any of those mentioned? 
Father and mother, be wise in your selec- 
tion. Give that dear child of yours the 
advantage of a few years at Lebanon 
Valley College. You wish him to be 
honored and to have an equal advantage 
with your neighbor's children. The horse 
and carriage may be his ruin. They have 
been the ruin of many a one. A Christian 
education is the best gift you can bestow. 
Will every reader ponder and act ? 



The sixth annual convention of the 
"Association of Colleges in the Middle 
States and Maryland " was held on Fri- 
day and Saturday, the 30th ult., and 1st 
inst., at the Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, Md. President Bierman and 
Professors Lehman and Good were in at- 
tendance. The body was ably presided 
over by Chancellor W. J. Holland, of 
Western University, Pittsburg. Among 
the questions discussed were the follow- 
ing : " The teaching of history and poli- 
tics in College." " The Future of the 
College," and "English in the College 
course." 

In an able address on Friday evening) 
Prof. Ira Remsen, of Johns Hopkins, ad- 
vocated among other things the modifica- 
tion of the present college course. He 
said he thought the time had come to 
make a " backward reform." Young m en 
are graduated from college at an average 



4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



153 



age of twenty-two years, and they are 
thirty years old before they get settled in 
a profession. Take off some of the re- 
quirements for admission to college in- 
stead of trying to add to them. Let a 
boy go to college earlier. Much of the 
present trouble is due to the confusion of 
a university and a college, one trying to 
do the work of the other. Johns Hopkins 
has not been entirely free from blame in 
this matter. 

The address was well received. Over 
two hundred delegates were present, and 
uo effort was spared to make them com- 
fortable and the meeting a success. 

The delegates visited in a body the 
Women's College, under the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and the Bryn Mawr 
School, managed by the Friends. On Fri- 
day evening, after Dr. Remsen's address, a 
royal reception was tendered the delegates 
by the authorities of Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 



Y. W. C. A. State Convention. 

The Seventh Annual Convention of the 
Y. W. C. A. was held in the city of 
Scranton, November 9-11, and was a de- 
cided scccess in every repect. 

Scranton is rightly named the city of 
conventions, since so many conventions 
are held there. A convention of the Bp- 
Worth League was in progress in that 
city when our meeting opened. 

The meetings, with the exception of 
those held Saturday evening and Sunday, 
were in the Y. M. C. A. hall. 

The first session, held Friday afternoon, 
^as opened by devotional exercises, at 
Jtoch time the Association hymn, " True 
Hearted," was sung. 

Quite a number of three-minute ad- 
r esses were then given, representing the 
«cranton Y. W. C. A., the W. C. t! U., 
D ], p »stor's Union and the Young Peo- 

* e s Societies of the various churches. 

eff P erman ent organization was soon 
Mi p t?' Which resulted in th e election of 

* ™- Burtner, of York, as chairman. 
cli £«• J . H. Gilmore, University of Ro 



gave a Bible study on the reading 



°f tl u a study 
Bibl' 6 r( h He advised us to have two 
for s?'^ 0110 for devotional study, and one 
study i n general. We should have a 



certain time for reading our Bibles, and 
it should not be at the unseasonable hour 
often p. m., when we are too weary to 
accomplish anything else. We should 
read carefully and candidly and with prac- 
tical ends in view. 

The speaker closed his remarks by liken- 
ing the Bible to a medicine chest, in which 
could be found a remedy for all our ills. 

In the evening a lengthy paper, on 
"Physical Well-being of Women," was 
read by C. E. Ehringer, M. D., of West 
Chester. He spoke chiefly in regard to 
the nervous condition of mankind, and of 
woman in particular. The cause of this 
trouble, he thinks, is the great ambition 
and overworked brains and bodies, and 
as a result we have insanity, the product 
of civilization. 

Rev. James Carter, D. D., of Williams- 
port, then gave the annual address which 
treated of Y. W. C. A. work in cities. 

He forcibly called our attention to the 
needs of young women and especially 
those of the working class, and he recom- 
mended the organization of associations 
in cities as the means of making the lives 
of such people better. 

Saturday morning we listened to the 
reports of delegates. There are twenty 
college and nine city associations in the 
State. Pittsburg is the banner city 
association, there being 1000 members. 
West Chester Normal is the banner 
school association, having a membership 
of 330. 

In the afternoon Mrs. Wm. Boyd, of 
Evanston, 111., read a lengthy paper on 
" The Evangelical Basis." The import of 
the paper was the text of membership 
which requires that one must be a mem- 
ber of some evangelical church in order 
to become a member of the association. 
By evangelical is meant any church 
which recognizes Christ as the only Savior 
of mankind, and the Bible as the only 
true guide of life. 

At the close of the session we were in- 
vited to the Y. W. C. A. gymnasium, 
where we enjoyed a drill conducted by 
the director, Miss Lois Shardlou. 

The evening meeting was held in the 
First Presbyterian church. The first 
speaker was Rev. Samuel Dodds, who 
gave an able address on the value of the 
Y. W. C. A. in colleges. He emphasized 
very emphatically the influence of col- 
lege women upon the world, and the 



15 4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



great importance of their be converted 
while in school. 

The last address of the evening was 
given b}^ Mrs. L. D. Wishard, of New York 
City, on the subject of woman's work 
in other lands. She spoke very tonchingly 
of some experiences she had while in 
China, and especially of the degradation in 
which she found woman. The remedy she 
suggested for this was the sending out of 
more missionaries. 

If any one meeting of the convention 
was better than another it was the one 
held on Sunday evening. Mrs. Agnes 
Hill, Secretary^, elect to India, made a very 
eloquent address in behalf of the claims of 
missions on Christains. 

Mrs. Hill's appeal in behalf of those 
who do not have the Gospel light was 
certainly pathetic. She spoke of the vast 
population of those Eastern countries and 
how few of them are Christains. She 
closed her address with the thought that 
notwithstanding we have those in our own 
land who are not Christains, but could be 
if they so desired, should we on their ac- 
count keep all workers at home and send 
more to those who are perishing because 
they have no help. 

The farewell services were held immedi- 
ately following the missionary meeting. 
As is the custom, the delegates joined 
hands, formed a circle around the im- 
mense room and sang "Blest be the Tie," 
after which convention was adjourned. 

We left feeling that our time had been 
well employed, and that we could not help 
being better for having participated in the 
exercises of those few days. 

Anna M. Thompson. 



To Foreign Lands. 

Probably never have we been impressed 
so forcibly with the idea of giving our 
lives entirely to the service of the Master 
as when, on the morning of the 24th ult., 
there appeared in the College Chapel, Mr. 
and Mrs. A. T. Howard and Miss Florence 
M. Cronise, three of the six missionaries 
who sailed on Wednesday, the 28th, for 
Africa, where they will devote their lives 
to telling the Glad Story to those who 
are in heathendom. 

After bidding good-by to their friends 
in Lebanon City on Friday evening, they 
came to Annville. 

Arrangements were made to have a 
farewell service for them in the College 
Chapel early on Saturday morning. 



After the audience had sung a selection 
Miss Cronise gave an address. She said 
she would have one thought remain with us 
"Joy in Christian Service." She also said 
that it should take less courage to obey 
the Lord than to disobey him. 

Mrs. Howard then very beautifully 
showed us, by numerous Scriptural quo- 
tations, how she felt her call and duty in 
respect to missionary work, and the great 
satisfaction she has in engaging in it. 

Mr. Howard then very fittingly remark- 
ed that although we should do personal 
work in the College, yet we should look 
forward to the great work of the future. 
The professions and trades in this country 
are crowed, but the field of usefulness in 
foreign lands is open for workers. 

After nearly all the students promised 
by rising to their feet to follow them with 
their praj-ers, a touching farewell was 
given them. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. King and Miss Min- 
nie B. Eaton are the other three who go 
with them. 

Miss Cronise was formerly professor 
of modern languages and literature in 
Otterbein University. Mr. and Mrs. 
King and Mr. and Mrs. Howard have all 
been educated at Otterbein. 

Mr. Howard will take charge of the 
Rufus Clarke and wife training school. 

Oh, that we might appreciate more 
the grand work that they are about to 
engage in ! 

May they have the prayers of the 
church as they assume this great under- 
taking and engage in their labor of love- 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 



A "humorous" programme will be an 
interesting feature of our rhetorical wors 
in the near future. 

In looking over our register we wei 
surprised to find that duri ng last Septem- 
ber a greater number of members jo^ 
the Society than during any other on 
month of the Society's historv. . 

At the recent election the follo^ 
officers were elected for the ensuing tei • 
President, J. H. Maysilles; Vice Pi -es 
dent, H. H. Heberly; Recording beer 
R. P. Dougherty; Correspond"! 



tary, 

Secretary, A. S. Ulrich; Critic, 
Sleichter; Chaplain, Allen Baer; 



C 



0r gan- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



155 



5gt G. A. Ulrich; Janitor, W. Gr. Clip- 
pinger. 

Mr. Ira E. Albert filled the pulpit of 
the U. B. church at Palmyra on the 25th 
ult. Messrs. Allen Baer and Harry Boyer 
aided in evangelistic work, the former at 
Kauffman's, the latter at Pleasant Hill. 

The many kind words of praise which 
the neat appearance of our library has 
called from our friends are certainly very 
encouraging, but a few volumes from 
those who appreciate the improvement 
would stimulate us to greater exertions in 
the collection and preservation of this 
most valuable auxiliary of our Society 
and at the same time fill some of our 
empty shelves. 

The Society was certainly never better 
able to receive and carefully preserve 
such books as her friends have been 
pleased to entrust to her keeping than at 
present and this we hope will cause many 
to send us those volumes which the}' may 
deem useful to the Society. 

We close our work for the Fall term 
with the consciousness that our efforts in 
rhetorical work have resulted in great 
good to us all. During the past term our 
greatest source of inspiration has been 
the weekly meeting of the Society. Every 
exercise was filled with that enthusiasm 
which is the result of earnest and unre- 
mitting devotion to our work. Noble eu- 
logies have inspired us with loftier pur- 
poses, have given us higher aims, and 
Wader conceptions of the object of life. 
The many discussions of the various so- 
cial and economic problems have aroused 
our energies with the determination that 
our lives shall be cast in the great vortex 
of struggling humanity, and, in the Prov- 
idence of God, be factors in the evolution 
of those mighty movements which shall 
result in the amelioration of the race. 

Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Raima Non Sine Pulvere. 



As we are drawing nigh to the end of 
e term, we feel that our work has been 
^benefit af we ^ as a pleasure. The meet- 
gs having been interrupted frequently, 
^ term seemed rather short, yet our ef- 
° r ts have been put forth with a deter- 
ged will. 

c ^ e a H look forward to the coming va- 
' lQ n to have a very pleasant time at our 
e8 Pecti v « homes. 



H. H. Sloat, '93, who is engaged as a 
teacher at Rockport, made a short visit 
to his friends at school on the 29th ult., 
after which he went to his home at Man- 
chester for a short time. It has been over 
a year since he last saw the school and 
friends, and he expressed himself as having 
had an enjoj-able visit. 

David Buddinger is very much inter- 
ested in the meetings held in a church 
across the hill, and makes frequent visits. 

Rev. J. T. Spangler, of Hagerstown r 
Md., is highly delighted with Miss Ruth; 
she is about one month old. 

This being the last month of the year, 
the editor bids you all a Merry Christmas 
and a Happy New Year. 



Clioniaii Literary Society. 



Virtute et Fide. 



The Clios are anticipating a pleasant 
time for the 14th inst., when they will 
have a joint meeting with the K. L. S- 
These meetings are always appreciated, as 
they are sources of instruction as well as 
enjoyment. 

Miss Klinedinst enjoyed a visit from 
her mother on Thanksgiving. 

Mr. Bender, from Dillsburg, paid a visit 
to his daughter, Rosa, on the 29th of 
November. 

Misses Parks and Young, from Steel- 
ton, and Miss Roop, from Lebanon, vis- 
ited Miss Fetrow a few days last month. 

Miss Mumma visited her sister, Ruth r 
on the 17th of November. 

Miss Fetrow enjoyed a pleasant visit 
from her father on the 25th of last month. 

Misses Stehman and Bertha Mumma 
attended a concert at Lebanon on the 23d 
of November. 

Quite a number of ex-members attended 
the anniversary and reception on Thanks- 
giving. Among them we noticed Misses 
Swartz, '88, Quigley, '91, Delia Roop, '92 r 
Wilson, '94, and others. We are always 
glad to have our ex-members visit us, and 
hope they will visit us frequently in the 
future. 

Among the few exclusively ladies 
journals that we receive, Oak Leaves T 
Kalamazoo, Mich., is in the front rank. 
Although it is one of our new exchanges,, 
yet we hold it in as much esteem as an 
old one. It compares in size and literary 
power with the standard college magazine. 



156 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Clionian Anniversary. 

Fortunes, like misfortunes, ofttimes 
come in showers. The history of Thanks- 
giving might be put into a single sentence, 
a perfect morn, a magnificent dinner, a 
glorious afternoon, a delightful evening 
and pleasant memories. Yet to those of 
us to whom this occasion means so much, 
entertaining pages might he filled with 
those enjoyable details, the sum total of 
which conspired to make this the red- 
letter clay of the year. 

All day long the mellow sunlight fell 
upon busy Clios streaming from all direc- 
tions with plants and other decorations, 
and when, at last, night cast her chilly 
gloom about the campus they welcomed 
their many friends in the chapel, filled 
with a flood of light and wealth of joyous 
smiles. The rostrum had a decidedly 
striking and delightful appearance. Great 
decorative ability was displayed on every 
side. Minerva, standing in a grove of 
palms and ferns, replete with expressive 
earnestness and wisdom, and the embodi- 
ment of strength, grandeur and majesty, 
seemed to preside over the exercises. 

The audience was large and enthusias- 
tic. Many had come from a distance — 
Clionia's elder daughters whom loyalty 
and affection drew back to the old halls 
and familiar scenes. Eager expectation 
was visible in every countenance, and we 
believe no one was disappointed; but in 
the excellent programme which was ren- 
dered all realized their highest anticipa- 
tions. 

Promptly at 7:30 amid enthusiastic ap- 
plause the officers and participants were 
ushered to the rostrum. The President, 
Miss Estella Stehman, in a few well- 
chosen words, pronounced the address of 
welcome, sitting forth the cherished hopes 
and aims of the Society as well as such 
words of greeting as were fitting for the 
•occasion. The following programme was 
then rendered : 

PROGRAMME. 

Instrumental Quartet— Overture— Zampa 

Lattenberg. 
Missus Black, Kreider, Light and Klinedinst. 

Invocation, Rev. M. J. Mumma. 

Vocal Solo— Tying Her Bonnet Under Her Chin 

Carter. 

Miss Flint. 

Essay— White and gold Mary E. Richard. 

Instrumental Solo— Bubbling Spring, Rive King. 

Miss May Light. 
Oration— Clio— The Muse ot History, Bertha Mumma. 

Recitation— Zingarella, Mary E. Kreider. 

Vocal Solo— L'esta9i, Aidlti. 

Miss Estella Stehman. 
Ex-Oration— Woman in History, Miss Mary Shenk. 

Instrumental Duet-Qui Vive Galop, Wells. 

Misses Bender and Ruth Mumma. 



The essay, "White and Gold," was a 
most delightful production. These are 
the colors of the society — white, purity > 
gold, true worth. Miss Richard drew 
various lessons from these emblems ; all 
high, noble and inspiring, and her grace- 
ful deliver added not a little to the at- 
tractiveness of the essay. 

Miss Mumma showed what conceptions 
the ancients had of the various deities, 
and how they saw the supernatural in all 
things. Of these none were more highly 
honored than the nine Muses, of whom 
Clio, the Muse of history, presiding over 
the archives of the nations and preserving 
the deeds of former generations, was one 
of the foremost in power and influence. 
Take away the goddess, history is left, a 
living power, utilizing the experience of 
the ages in the accomplishment of a pres- 
ent purpose. The oration showed remark- 
able familiarity with the world's history 
as an influence permeating through the 
very core of a nation's life. 

Miss Kreider deserves great credit for 
the excellent rendition of " Zingarella," 
a recitation so full of dramatic changes 
and difficult delineations as to tax the 
abilities of trained elocutionists. Not- 
withstanding these difficulties, Miss Krei- 
der acquitted herself creditably. 

The ex-oration, " Women in History," 
was greatly enjoyed by all and abounded 
in some earnest and inspiring sentiments 
to the present members of the Society. 

This oration is published in another 
column. 

Of the musical part of the programme 
no more can be said than that it was well 
suited for the occasion and rendered in a 
manner to win the highest praise from all 
present. 

After the anniversary exercises a re- 
ception was held in the ladies' hall from 
nine to eleven o'clock. Misses Estella 
Stehman, Bertha Mumma, Ella Black, 
Mary E. Kreider and Blache Kephart re- 
ceived the guests. 

The hall and parlors were tastefully 
decorated with the "White and Gold," and 
potted plants added to the attractiveness. 
The hour for departure arrived all t0 ° 
soon for the many guests who were p ie " 
sent. " Elabraretl 



Rev. D. D. Keedy, of Keedysy ille, 



is in poor health. Bro. Keedy is >a stall . n . C ^ 
friend of the College. We all Wish him 
many years more of life. 1 



TEE COLLEGE FORUM. 



157 



Personals. 

A Merry Christmas ! 
Ho ! ho ! vacation clays are near. 
Prof. Good spent Sunday the 18th at 
his home. 

Rev Ira E. Albert, '97, preached at Pal- 
myra on the eve of the 25th ult. 

Wm. Kindt, '90, was a pleasant visitor 
at the College a few weeks ago. 

Harry Heberly, '96, spent Sunday, 
November 11th, at his home in Mt. Wolf. 

A number of the boys have learned to 
ride bicycles of late. 

A class in zoology, consisting of over 
thirty members, has been organized re- 
cently. 

President Bierman attended Court at 
Reading as a witness, during the latter 
part of November. 

Some of the boys are attending the re- 
vival services conducted by Rev. Light at 
Kauffman's Church. 

Mr. Alvin McNair, of Middletown, 
visited his daughter Ella, at the College, 
Friday the 9th ult. 

Reno S. Harp, editor of the Frederick 
(Md.) Examiner, recently paid a short 
visit to his alma mater. 

Mr. Luther Grove, of Scotland, Pa., 
surprised his son, Ambrose, by calling on 
him Wednesday the 28th. 

Miss Lizzie Mumma, of Florin, Lancas- 
ter Co., was the guest of her sister Ruth, 
Nov. 17th to 19th. 

, E. P. Anthony made a trip to his home 
}n Chambersburg, November 16th, remain- 
ing several days. 

The wife of Rev. Washinger, of Cham- 
oersburg, who has been in very poor 
Health, is slightly convalescing. 

The ladies were visited December 7 by 
Jss Mary S. Dunn, of Scranton, Pa. 3 
6 tate Sacretary of the Y. W. C. A. 

A number of the students and profes- 
sors attended the Lebanon County Teach- 
ers Institute, held November 19th-23d. 

th^Ti* A ' A ' Lon S» of Columbia, delivered 
^ luanksgiving sermon of that city. 
Qe press was very complimentary of it. 

fan 10 *,' Deaner was called to attend the 
wneral of his uncle, Aaron F. Baker, at 
^eciysville, Md., on Thanksgiving Day. 

TVith 6 Weie t0 haVe Kreider > ' 94 > 

u § during the Thanksgiving vacation. 



He is now a student at Yale, and took this 
opportunity to visit his parents. 

Some of the others vho spent the holi- 
day here were Horace Crider, '93, of York, 
D. A. Kreider, '92, who is now a student 
at Yale, and S. P. Backastow. '93. 

Miss Kate Barr, of Elizabethtown, ac- 
companied by her mother, paid us a visit 
on the 10th ult. She was formerly a stu- 
dent here and contemplates returning in 
the spring. 

The Thanksgiving dinner was all that 
epicureans could desire. Turkey, cran- 
berry-sauce and pumpkin pie with other 
delicacies constituted the meal. 

Messrs. Reber, Snoke and Clippinger 
attended Sunday-school and preaching 
services at the Hill Church on the 25th, 
and afterwards enjo}^ed a bounteous din- 
ner at the home of Mr. Jacob Zerbe, '98. 

Prof. McDermad (In Zooiog}' Class) : 
" Which way do most insects move their 
jaws ?" 

Aspiring Prep. : " East and west, Pro- 
fessor." 

Prof. Lehman attended the Y. P. C. U. 
Convention of the East Pennsylvania Con- 
ference, held at Harrisburg, November 6th 
and 7th. He was again reelected presi- 
dent of the convention to serve his fourth 
term. 

President Bierman, Prof. Lehman and 
Prof. Good attended the Association of 
Colleges and Preparatory Schools, in its 
sixth annual session at Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md., on November 
30th and December 1st. 

After all had satisfied their appetites, 
Prof. O. E. Good, toast-master for the oc- 
casion, called for the toasts as they had 
been previously assigned : " The Origin 
and History of Thanksgiving," Prof. Mc- 
Dermad ; " What should we be thankful 
for?" J. PI. Maysilles, and ''How may we 
best express our thankfulness?" W. G. 
Clippinger. After the speakers had re- 
sponded to the toasts, Ira E. Albert was 
called on, and made a neat speech. 

On Friday evening, November 30, Rev. 
G. W. Stevens gave his illustrated lec- 
ture, " A Ramble through Switzerland," 
in the College chapel. It consisted of 
stereoscopic views of the beautiful scenery 
of Switzerland, accompanied by a descrip- 
tion of them by the lecturer which was 
interspersed with strains of humor. The 
lecture closed by the audience singing 



158 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



a Nearer My God to Thee," which was 
beautifully illustrated on the canvas. 

The efforts of the Y. M. dA. during 
the week of prayer were attended with rich 
results. The young men conducted a 
meeting in the lecture room of the church 
the Sabbath evening preceding, after which 
Rev. Mumma, the pastor, delivered an 
able sermon to the young men. Every 
evening during the week spirited meetings 
were held both in public and private 
rooms. After a considerable amount of 
personal effort, the students' labors were 
rewarded by seeing a number of their fel- 
lows happily converted. Besides, all the 
workers were spiritually strengthened. 
We feel that this week of work for the 
Master has resulted gloriously. 



Exchanges. 

The Reveille, of Pennsylvania Military 
College, has donned a new garb, which 
we find little improved over its old dress. 
Its contents, however, continue to give 
evidence of the skillful literary labors of 
its editors. 

To the following new exchanges we ex- 
tend a most cordial welcome, and we hope 
to see them often upon our table : Aegis, 
Oakland, Cal., Pennington Seminary Re- 
view, Wofford College Journal and the 
Erskinian. 

The Otterbein Aegis for November con- 
tains a very good article under the unique 
title, " Myself + Time X." It treats 
of some very important problems of life 
as seen from a mathematical standpoint. 
We feel sure that a careful reading of this 
article will be naught but beneficial to 
the reader. 

One of our exchanges gives the follow- 
ing version of the popular slang phrase, 
" He does not cut ice with us :" " He does 
not cause a molecular separation in the 
masses of aqueous matter solidified by 
the application of an intense degree of 
frigidity that is by subtraction of caloric 
energy." 

Several of our exchanges in their recent 
issues have devoted almost their entire 
space to athletic news. While we believe 
most firmly in a school journal's duty to 
aid in arousing athletic interest b} r pub- 
lishing the events of the school, yet we do 
not approve of the plan mentioned above. 
This was particularly noticeable in € the 
Wind Mill, whose November issue might 
be styled an athletic one. 



As there are so many important phases 
of student life to be touched upon by the 
school journal, we think undue attention 
to one particular phase is detrimental 
to its standard of success. 



o 

CHARLES FOSTER PUBLISHING CO. 

716 SAJN'SOM ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Why Not Make Pictnres ? . . . . 



WHEN, WITH THE 



Pronto Camera, 




Success is so Certain that WE 
GUARANTEE IT, and you can do all 
the Work Yourself. 

Prices, 4x5 Size, $12 to j ga 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 

RoehesterOpticaiCo. 



ROCHESTER, N. Y« 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



159 



CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIMETABLE— Oct. 1, 1893. 



Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Martinsburg . ... 

' Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

« Chambersburg .. 

" Shippensburg 

" Newville 

" Carlisle 

" Mechauicsburg.. 
Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 10 
6 32 

6 53 

7 18 
7 42 



8 03 

11 25 
2 03 
11 15 

A. M. 



Ky'e 


Mr'g 


Day 


Ev'g 


N'gt 


Exp 


Mail 


Exp 


Mall 


Exp 


No. 2 


No. 4 


No. 6 


No. 8 


No. 10 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


6 15 






2 30 


3 20 


7 00 






3 20 


4 50 


7 40 


8 30 


11 25 


4 10 


7 10 


8 09 




11 48 


4 36 


736 


8 30 


9 05 


12 08 


5 00- 


8 00 


8 55 




12 30 


5 30 


816 


9 15 




12 50 


5 51 


8 53 


9 40 


9 56 


1 15 


6 17 


9 20 


10 04 




1 40 


6 43 


9 43 


10 25 


10 30 


200 


7 05 


10 05 










A. M. 


1 25 


1 25 


6 50 


1115 


4 30 


4 03 


4 03 


938 


3 50 


7 33 


3 10 


3 10 


6 45 


10 40 


6 20 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 7:68 a. m., 3:40 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 8:03 a. m., 4:30 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham- 
bersburg. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

New York.. .. 
Philadelphia.. 



1 Harrisburg 

' Dillsburg 

1 Mechauicsburg. 

' Carlisle 

' Newville 

' Shippensburg.... 

' Chambersburg.. 

' Greencastle 

' Hagerstown 

' Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp. 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 


No. 7 


No.17 


No. 9 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


11 40 


4 45 


8 53 


11 20 


215 


4 23 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


2 06 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


1150 


2 20 


4 30 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M, 


4 40 


7 53 


12 40 


3 40 


5 20 


8 00 


5 03 


8 13 


1 03 


4 01 


5 41 


8 20 


5 30 


8 36 


1 29 


425 


6 05 


8 44 


555 


9 00 


1 52 


4 55 


6 36 


9 08 


6 15 


9 21 


213 


510 


6 57 


9 29 


6 40 


9 43 


2 35 


5 35 


720 


9 50 


7 02 


10 04 


3 01 


5 50 




10 12 


725 


10 27 


325 


6 18 




10 35 


9 30 


11 12 




7 02 






11 00 


12 00 




7 50 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 10:35 a. m.. 10:45 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 11:20 a. m., 
11:30 p. m., stopping at all intermediate stations ; additional 
tram will leave Hagerstown at 8:00 a. m., arriving at 11:00 
a. m., stopping at all i termediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express w^st. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
f^Pregshe tween Philadelphia and Nhw O rleans. 

IF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
write to GEO. 1*. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
ge w York. 

EVERY one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
vertising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Advertisers," 368 pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage 
Paid, on receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
we American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
wa class journals: gives the circulation rating of every one, 
anu a good deal of information about rates and other matters 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Address KOW- 
Yo k A " VERTISII,(<J BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, New 



Rensselaer ^ 



Institute, 

Troy, N.Y. 



Local e 



ns nrovided for. Send for a Catalogue. 



A BRILLIANT STUDENT. 

envfp^ d K 0f tne clas . perfect recitations, and examinations, 
BQ bv all To attain t-uch honor a good memory is nec- 



by all. 
Thei 



TOftiVrV 16 new Physiological discovery— MEMO KY RES- 
tlierni E TABLETS quickly and permanently increase 
Powpr i°- ry two t0 ten-fold and greatly augment intellectual 
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P08 tljaid. Send for circular. 

MEMORY TABLET CO., 114 5th Ave., N. Y. 



W. F. BECKER. J. P. BRUGGER 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Special Rates to Students. 

HEP" Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOK PRICES. 

H. A. LOSER, 

GROCERIES AND CONFECTIONERY, 

OYSTERS AND ICE CREAM, 

ANNVILLE, FA.. 

g B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE, PA 

ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, FA. 

THE BEST GOODS FO.t THE LEAST MONEY. 

T R. McCAULY, ~ 
DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE. FA. 



J 



OHN TRUMP, 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumer; and Toilet Articles, 

No. 3 East Main St., Annville, Fa. 




CAN I OBTATN A PATENT? For a 

Srompt answer and an honest oninion, write to 
IUNN & CO., who have had nearly fifty years' 
experience in the patent business. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. A Handbook of In- 
formal ion concerning Patents and how to ob- 
tain them sent free. Also a catalogue Of median* 
leal and scientific books sent free. 

Patents taken through Munn & On, receive 
special notice in the Scientific American, and 
thus are brought widely before the public with- 
out cost to the inventor. This splendid paper, 
issued weeMy, elegantly iMustrated.toaa by far the 
largest Circulation of any ocientiflc WOTS in she 
world. $3 a year. Sample copies sontiree. 

Building Edition monthly, 82.50 a vear. 6inrrle 
Copies, k iH cents. Every number contains bea>> 
tifui plates, in aoloi'B, and photographs of new 
houses, with plans, enabling builders to show the 
latest designs ami secure contracts. Address 
MUNN & CO., New STORK. tfUI BliOADWAX 



160 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



D 



^^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 

SUA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 
FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

BY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

— AND — 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J. S. SHORES, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

SNOW FLAKE PRINTING HOUSE, 
A. C. M. HEISTER, Prop., 
FINE JOB PRINTIN, 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Annville, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KKEIDElt. JKO. E. UK UK. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OP 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE , j s E ^7 a m7Tl e r • s 

ANNTILLE, PA. 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
TERS AND CREAM. AIWIttlZlLLE, PA, 

S. M. SHENK S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Henn'a House, Annville. 

St. 33. TOrAG-CTSXt., 

— Headquarters 1' or — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 

Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



If you want to Buy a Hat right, and a rtgnt Hat, or anything ib 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT &, Co., 
Eighth and Cumberland Sis., Lebanon, P a , 

Kinports & Shenls 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away Irom home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U. B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $8.00. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $116,809.94 

Contingent Assets 11(;,970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,000.00 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN. 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, witb 
pro rata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



Age. 


Ass't 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


ASSM'T 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


50 


1 30 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


92 


51 


1 40 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


52 


1 59 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


53 


1 60 
1 70 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


54 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 00 


55 


1 80 


26 
27 


71 

72 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


56 


1 92 


28 
29 


73 
74 


37 
38 
39 


87 
88 
89 


47 
48 
49 


1 12 
1 18 
1 24 











This will entitle a member to a certificate of | lu r 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, ^ ne 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 



F. W. FROST, 
BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK 
MANUFACTURER, 

783 Cumberland St., - - Lebanon, P a '